Internet exposes Psystar’s shenanigans

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Internet exposes Psystar’s shenanigans

I never expected to use shenanigans in a tech headline, but it seems to be the best word to describe what’s happening with Florida-based (err supposedly Florida-based) Psystar.  The company caused a BIG stir this week by announcing their Open Computer which is basically a Mac clone.  Everyone expects Apple to sue Psystar into oblivion, but it seems bloggers and blog readers may take the company down first.Miami (FL) – I never expected to use shenanigans in a tech headline, but it seems to be the best word to describe what’s happening with Florida-based (err supposedly Florida-based) Psystar.  The company caused a BIG stir this week by announcing their Open Computer which is basically a Mac clone.  Everyone expects Apple to sue Psystar into oblivion, but it seems bloggers and blog readers may take the company down first.

Psystar had announced a $399 computer that would run Mac OS X and thousands of people flocked to the website to put in their orders.  The flood of visitors – many who happily gave up their credit card numbers – temporarily crashed Psystar’s site.

But that was just the beginning of the company’s problems because the online store has recently stopped taking orders.  “We’re sorry but the store is temporarily down,” the website said today.  That could have something to do with payment processor PowerPay cutting off services.  Psystar says PowerPay “dropped the ball” and was not ready to handle the huge volume of orders.  PowerPay struck back by telling reporters with News.com that Psystar violated its service terms.  Psystars says it will use PayPal until a more suitable merchant processor can be found.

And then there’s the issue with the constantly changing addresses.  Charles Arthur with the Guardian noticed that the address has changed four times on the website since the announcement.  The current address is 10475 NW 28th St in Doral Florida.  Readers of the popular gadget blog Gizmodo went one step further and actually physically investigated the  addresses and found that they belonged to other businesses who’ve never heard of Psystar.

Rudy Pedraza, President of Psystar, told Tom’s Hardware that the previous addresses were incorrectly posted on the website.  He also chastised Gizmodo saying that the site “got it completely wrong”.  But really who are you going to believe?  The information posted on Gizmodo seems legit to us and the pictures of the location are pretty damning evidence that something is wrong.

Apple so far has kept a very low profile during all of this.  The company hasn’t issued any statements, even though the End User License Agreement for OS X states that it must be used on a genuine Apple machine.  But Apple’s executives and attorneys may get a free pass on this one because the web will probably take care of Psystar.  The Internet has a long history of sniffing out scams and hell hath no fury like that of a pissed off blogger.

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