Google Maps and New York City create ingenious local resource

Posted by Samantha Rose Hunt

New York (NY) - The newly launched NYCGo website, created by the New York City government in conjunction with Google, is designed to provide resources for both visitors and locals. Along with the launch came the unveiling of a newly renovated New York City Information Center, which is located just a few blocks north of the tourist Mecca - Times Square.





NYCGo.com is not only comprised of details from Google maps, but it also shares travel deals from Travelocity and other local content from the New York Observer, Time Out New York, the local nightlife magazine Paper, and Greenopia (a guide to environmentally savvy living).



The information center is located on Seventh Avenue between 52nd and 53rd streets.



The launch was announced via a guest post on the official Google Blog by the New York City Mayor himself, Michael Bloomberg:


"The Information Center features interactive map tables, powered by the Google Maps API for Flash, that let you navigate venues and attractions as well as create personalized itineraries, which can be printed, emailed or sent to mobile devices," detailed the blog post. "Additionally, there's a gigantic video wall that utilizes Google Earth to display a 3D model of New York City on which you can map out personalized itineraries."



As was recently revealed with similar new technology renovations at The White House's website, Mayor Bloomberg has updated his city working very hard to bring its technology up to date. During his time in office he's pushed a wind power plant and a city-run venture firm. He's also seen Google open a New York City satellite office, which occupies several floors in the historic former Port Authority building located downtown.



NYCGo and the new Whitehouse.gov websites are just two examples of the Internet's power when properly applied. These two sites are also quite likely just the tip of the iceberg of online renovations we'll be seeing in 2009 as the Internet population moves toward its second billion.