iPod could interfere with pacemakers – study

A new study authored by a 17-year-old high school student claims that Apple’s iPod music player could interfere with pacemakers.

Interview with Mr. Gigapixel

Imagine a cityscape picture so detailed that you could see signs and plants on a window sill from blocks away.  Gerard Maynard, a New York resident and artist, recently made such a picture spanning nearly 280k by 47k pixels detailing several blocks of Harlem.  In a short interview, Maynard told TG Daily about the challenges of working with the equipment and his future plans.

Intel’s 45 nm dual-core desktop processor entering final testing phase

Intel apparently is well on track to ramp Penryn and its sister CPUs into volume production in the third quarter of this year. A little birdie told us that Wolfdale, the desktop variant of Penryn, has reached final pre-release status and in fact may be sent out to most system builders for testing purposes and early reviews next month.

Vista to go: Sandisk improves U3 flash drives with Microsoft’s help

U3 sticks, flash based memory devices that allow users to carry launch ready applications on chewing-gum sized portable storage, have been around for a while, but never really conquered the market. Sandisk now has convinced Microsoft to help market the next version of U3 sticks in the hope to attract more eyeballs and wallets.

Europe’s Galileo nav system touts super accurate clocks

Sure your digital wristwatch is accurate, but that’s nothing compared to the on-board clocks of the Galileo navigation satellites.

Helio Ocean waves into the US

Los Angeles (CA) - The double-jointed, multi-keyed Helio Ocean phone has found its way to the United States.   The advanced device contains multiple features Helio says have not been seen in previous phones.

Analyst opinion: Intel kicks laptops into high gear

There is a lot going on this week in terms of laptop PCs thanks to the arrival of Intel’s new Santa Rosa chipset. But this isn’t just about Intel, new AMD products are rolling to market as well and both come with refreshed graphics and storage options.

Sony debuts new Blu-ray Vaio notebook

Sony has unveiled its latest Vaio notebook computer to come pre-installed with a Blu-ray Disc (BD) player.

Samsung announces 65nm-made DTV receiver IC

AMD shows off upcoming boards and chipsets

AMD showed off their upcoming enterprise and consumer-level motherboards and chipsets at a press event in Monterey California.

Hitachi ships fastest and biggest drive

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies is announcing volume shipments of its 200 GB, 7200 RPM Travelstar drive.

AMD demos 8-core Agena FX enthusiast PC, stream processing

Monterey (CA) – AMD is getting more aggressive in discussing technologies that are cooking in the company’s labs. What we learned today is that Agena, the firm’s upcoming desktop quad-core processor in fact is alive and kicking and stream processing may very well reach beyond the enterprise application market and finally enable high-powered consumer applications the IT industry promised ten years ago.

Nvidia announces new GeForce 8 GPU for notebook PC

D-Link releases 2.0 upgrades for Draft 802.11n products

Nvidia unveils new Quadro FX mobile graphics solutions

Is Intel’s ‘Turbo Memory’ really turbo?

Flash memory is great for portable USB drives and cameras, but does it belong on your motherboard?

AMD showcases 45 nm silicon

Monterey (CA) – At an event held in Monterey today, AMD showed a wafer with “fully functional” 45 nm silicon for the first time. According to chief technology officer Phil Hester, the 300 mm wafer code-named “Typhoon”,  shown in public for the first time today, holds 45 nm dies combining SRAM and logic. The executive said that AMD’s 45 nm process is on track and recent notes from Intel that AMD is facing yield issues “are rubbish” and “wishful thinking  on their side”.  

Sony Ericsson introduces new phones

TSMC to ramp up production of Intel Wi-Fi chips in 3Q

University of Missouri gets hacked, again

More than 22,000 students are affected by a hacker's entry into the University of Missouri's computer database, an announcement made even more disturbing by the fact that the same thing happened at the school just a few months ago.