Claim: Personal touch signature makes mobile devices more secure

Passwords, gestures and fingerprint scans are all helpful ways to keep a thief from unlocking and using a cell phone or tablet. Cybersecurity researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have gone a step further.

Quantum cryptography for mobile phones

Secure mobile communications underpin our society and through mobile phones, tablets and laptops we have become online consumers. The security of mobile transactions is obscure to most people but is absolutely essential if we are to stay protected from malicious online attacks, fraud and theft.

Black markets for hackers are increasingly sophisticated, specialized and maturing

Black and gray markets for computer hacking tools, services and byproducts such as stolen credit card numbers continue to expand, creating an increasing threat to businesses, governments and individuals, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

New technique targets C code to spot, contain malware attacks

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new tool to detect and contain malware that attempts root exploits in Android devices. The tool improves on previous techniques by targeting code written in the C programming language – which is often used to create root exploit malware, whereas the bulk of Android applications are written in Java.

Using stolen computer processing cycles to mine Bitcoin

A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has taken an unprecedented, in-depth look at how malware operators use the computers they infect to mine Bitcoin, a virtual currency whose value is highly volatile.  

How to identify malicious Android apps on Google Play

"How do I know that the new installed app behaves as described?" asks Andreas Zeller, professor of software engineering at Saarland University. So far experts have identified so-called malicious apps by checking their behavior against patterns of known attacks. "But what if the attack is brand-new?" asks Zeller.

Finding the hidden zombie in your network

How do you detect a "botnet", a network of computers infected with malware -so-called zombies - that allow a third party to take control of those machines? The answer may lie in a statistical tool first published in 1966 and brought into the digital age researchers writing this month in the International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics.

Can this Blackphone stop the NSA?



PGP creator Phil Zimmermann is back with the uber-secure Blackphone.

RSA didn't let the NSA in through the backdoor

The RSA has angrily denied a claim that it secretly took $10 million from the NSA to use the buggered up Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator in its encryption products.

This Android app stops you being tracked in public

AVG, best known for its security software applications, has added WiFi Do Not Track (DNT) to is Android PirvacyFix app. This will kill all those comments about "Minority Report" and we are happy about anything that will stop people trying to sell us crap we don't want based on erroneous information that they've gotten through nefarious means. Suck it, retailers!

Report: Several top websites use device fingerprinting to secretly track user

A new study by KU Leuven-iMinds researchers has uncovered that 145 of the Internet’s 10,000 top websites track users without their knowledge or consent. The websites use hidden scripts to extract a device fingerprint from users’ browsers. Device fingerprinting circumvents legal restrictions imposed on the use of cookies and ignores the Do Not Track HTTP header. The findings suggest that secret tracking is more widespread than previously thought.

Video: Hackers bypass Apple's Touch ID

A hacker group based in Germany says it has managed to crack Apple's new Touch ID biometric security system with a modified fingerprint lifting method and a "fake finger" creation technique.

The DRM market is rapidly evolving

​The digital rights management (DRM) market will grow at a rate of 12% annually to become a $1.2 billion market by 2018, while the related conditional access (CAS) market will decline slightly to dip below $1.5 billion annually.

1-in-5 tweets divulge user location

#doyouknowwhoswatchingyou? A new study from USC researchers sampled more than 15 million tweets, showing that some Twitter users may be inadvertently revealing their location through updates on the social media channel.

Australian site at center of hacking attack: takes down New York Times and Twitter

Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) hackers "broke into" Melbourne IT, an Australian Internet services company that claims Twitter and the New York Times as its customers.

Claim: Attackers can compromise iPhone via chargers and apps

Researchers from the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) have discovered two security weaknesses that permit installation of malware onto Apple mobile devices using seemingly innocuous applications and peripherals, uncovering significant security threats to the iOS platform.

Navy turns to UAVs for help with radar, communications

Scientists recently launched unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from a research vessel in a significant experiment that could help boost the Navy’s radar and communications performance at sea.

Scientists develop 'mathematical jigsaw puzzles' to encrypt software

UCLA computer science professor Amit Sahai and a team of researchers have designed a system to encrypt software so that it only allows someone to use a program as intended while preventing any deciphering of the code behind it. This is known in computer science as "software obfuscation," and it is reportedly the first time it has been accomplished.

Report: Eye-tracking could replace passwords if made user-friendly

It’s a wonder we still put up with passwords. We forget our highly secretive combinations, so we frequently have them reset and sent to our cellphones and alternative email addresses. We come up with clever jumbles of letters and words, only to mess up the order. We sit there on the login screen, desperately punching in a code we should know by heart.

Report: New hardware design protects data in the cloud

Cloud computing - outsourcing computational tasks over the Internet - could give home-computer users unprecedented processing power and let small companies launch sophisticated Web services without building massive server farms.