Report: Graphene not all good

In a first-of-its-kind study of how a material some think could transform the electronics industry moves in water, researchers at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering found graphene oxide nanoparticles are very mobile in lakes or streams and therefore likely to cause negative environmental impacts if released.

Computer scientists develop new approach to sort cells up to 38x faster

A team of engineers led by computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has developed a new approach that marries computer vision and hardware optimization to sort cells up to 38 times faster than is currently possible. The approach could be used for clinical diagnostics, stem cell characterization and other applications.

Clock is based on a single atom

It may not be as accurate as today's atomic clocks, but it's an awful lot simpler in concept: a new way of measuring time based on the mass of an atom.

Cloaking technique could protect ships from waves

Mechanical engineers say they've found a way of adapting invisibility cloaking techniques to protect oil rigs and ships from rough waves.

Is the universe built like the internet?

The universe may be structured a lot like the human brain and even the internet, and similar laws may govern its growth.

Single Facebook message boosts election turnout

About a third of a million more Americans showed up at the ballot box in 2010 because of a single Facebook message on election day, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

First galaxies had an explosive birth

New data from the South Pole Telescope indicates that the birth of the first massive galaxies in the universe happened a lot more suddenly than suspected.

Could sea floor carpeting help harvest wave energy?


Carpet is usually something you try NOT to get wet. Dirt is a rug's worst enemy, and when you add moisture of any kind, it becomes a permanent stain faster than you can say "my name is Mud." 



Shrimp inspires lightweight body armor

Engineers are turning to a tiny crustacean for inspiration in creating military body armor and vehicle and aircraft frames.

Early birds wiped out giant flying insects

We have the first birds to thank for the fact that there are no longer any two-foot-long bugs buzzing about in the skies, say University of California, Santa Cruz scientists.

Working quantum computer built inside a diamond

A quantum computer created inside a diamond is the first of its kind to include protection against 'decoherence' – noise that prevents it from functioning properly.

Could antimatter weigh more than matter?

Antimatter may weigh more than matter of the same mass, say physicists at the University of California, Riverside, who are attempting to establish how it behaves in gravity.

Brain imaging reveals the movies in our minds

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have managed to decode and reconstruct dynamic visual experiences processed by the human brain.

Patients' nerves made to glow during surgery

Damaging a patient's nerves during surgery can cause agony - and even paralysis. But nerves are rather hard to see.

Oil could run dry long before substitutes can take over

Unless R&D is stepped up dramatically, stock market expectations indicate that global oil supplies will run out 90 years before replacement technologies are ready.

Artificial skin could give robots a lighter touch

Two US teams have developed artificial skins that are sensitive enough to detect the touch of a butterfly.       

'Dark silicon' improves Android battery life

A new chip is claimed to improve smartphone efficiency by making use of 'dark silicon' – the numerous transistors on today’s chips that are underused because there's not enough power to utilize them all at the same time.

Neuroscientists know what you're planning, even when you don't

Neuroscientists at the University of California Los Angeles claim they can can predict your behavior better than you can.

Martian fossils could be right under Rover's nose

A rock commonly found on Mars could, against expectations, preserve fossils, raising hopes that evidence of life on Mars may one day be found.

Giant space balloon crashes on launch

A multi-million-dollar space balloon crashed on takeoff this morning in Australia, hitting a car.