Astronomers find solar storms behave like supernovae

Researchers at UCL have studied the behaviour of the Sun's coronal mass ejections, explaining for the first time the details of how these huge eruptions behave as they fall back onto the Sun’s surface. In the process, they have discovered that coronal mass ejections have a surprising twin in the depths of space: the tendrils of gas in the Crab Nebula, which lie 6500 light-years away and are millions of times larger.

Powerful ancient explosions explain new class of supernovae

Astronomers affiliated with the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) have discovered two of the brightest and most distant supernovae ever recorded, 10 billion light-years away and a hundred times more luminous than a normal supernova. Their findings appear in the Dec. 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal.

Video: The clashing winds of a colossal binary

The hottest and most massive stars don't live nearly long enough to disperse throughout the galaxy.

This "tranquil" galaxy is home to violent events

The ESO's (European Southern Observatory) Very Large Telescope recently captured a new image of galaxy NGC 1187 - originally discovered by William Herschel in 1784.



Supernova observations may explain cosmic rays

Move over CERN: a pattern of X-ray 'stripes' in the remains of a supernova may provide the first direct evidence that supernovae can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than the Large Ladron Collider.