Samsung Galaxy S4 storms into the market

Smartphone juggernaut Samsung has reportedly managed to beat its own sales projections with the Galaxy S4.

Samsung becomes the smartphone chieftain

Smartphone wars are becoming rather predictable. Every quarter sales notch up and every quarter Samsung emerges as the big winner. The last quarter was no exception. However, growth is slowing as the market matures, although there is still plenty of room for growth in emerging markets. 

French to tax smartphones and tablets

The French government is seriously considering a new tax on smartphones and tablets. The one percent tax would be imposed on a range of “internet compatible devices” and it could yield about 86 million euro per year. 

Mobile shopping reaches a crescendo

Although mobile commerce is still experiencing teething problems in most markets, a growing number of consumers are turning to smartphones to improve their shopping experience. Even when they are not making actual transactions, they are using their smartphones to learn more about products and services.

DRAM shortage pushes prices up

The DRAM supply shortage isn’t getting better and memory maker Inotera now believes it will drag on until the end of the year. Strong demand for smartphones and tablets is to blame, and prices are going up as well.

Apple loses dominance with iPhone

More figures are proving to a shell shocked Apple loving press that the overly hyped iPhone is slowly dying and is set to fall behind Microsoft.

Lenovo takes aim at smartphone market

PC churner Lenovo is getting serious about the smartphone market, so serious in fact that it is planning to sell 60 million smartphones over the next 12 months.

LG ponders a return to making tablets

Consumer electronics giant LG is rumored to be going back into the tablet market, which it ditched two years ago.

Blackberry claws its way back

BlackBerry's new Q10 smartphone is selling well in both Canada and Britain, an industry analyst has claimed.

M-commerce gets IBM all excited

M-commerce is continuing to grow in the retail space, a report has suggested.

Apple losing market share to Samsung

Apple continues to lose ground to arch-rival Samsung at an alarming rate.

Samsung gets boost from extra smartphone sales

Growing sales of its smartphones have helped Samsung reach a record quarterly profit.

Apple still rules the tablet roost

According to the latest research from Strategy Analytics, global tablet shipments hit 40.6 million units in Q1 2013. Apple still dominates the market, but Android is gaining ground. In addition, the first Windows 8 tablets went on sale in Q1, but they haven’t been a runaway success, to say the least. 

Tablet market undergoes a turn around

Sales of oversized smartphones and tablets are strong, and according to Transparency Market Research, the trend is set to continue over the next five years. 

Smartphones to get cheaper and cheaper

As the smartphone juggernaut rumbles on, vendors are increasingly turning their efforts to emerging markets, with less disposable income and a much lower smartphone penetration rate.

More smartphones head into space

NASA has put three more smartphones into orbit on board of an Antares rocket. The tiny satellites were built in a standard cubesat frame and they were built using off-the-shelf components. They may very well be the cheapest satellites ever launched, Gizmag reckons.

Nokia comes back from the dead

Former rubber boot maker Nokia is likely to report that it has come back from the dead.

Intel resigns itself to a future without the letter "i"

Opinion In his departing notes to shareholders last night, Intel CEO Paul Otellini was remarkably upbeat about a boat that is increasingly beginning to resemble the now famous Itanic.

NAND memory market rockets

The NAND memory market is slated to hit $30 billion this year, up 12 percent over $26.8 billion in 2012.

Android meant for cameras, not smartphones

Smart cameras are finally starting to show up, but according to outgoing Android boss Andy Rubin, they could have been around for years. Speaking at an event in Tokyo, Rubin said Android was originally conceived as an operating system for cameras, not phones.