Consumer Watchdog asks DoJ to break up Google

An independent consumer group will today call on the Department of Justice to consider breaking Google up because of uncompetitive practices.

How often does your government ask Google to keep quiet?

Google has launched a new tool allowing users to see how often their government asks it to remove data.

Hoodie pings your Facebook friends

For some reason, designers just won't give up on the idea of us wearing our technology. The idea might appeal to owners of garment and tech factories, perhaps, who could halve the number of exploited teenagers needed to produce the things.

Google blocked in a quarter of countries

China may be the most extreme example, but Google says its services are blocked or censored in a quarter of the countries in which it operates.

Beetles beat Avatar to circular polarization

Jewel scarab beetles can see using circularly polarised light - the same as is used in 3D movies such as Avatar. And they don't even need special glasses.

Sensor wraps itself round the brain

Scientists have developed a brain implant that melts into place, fitting to the brain's surface like shrink-wrap.

Travelers Twitter their way back home

Travelers stranded by the effects of the Icelandic volcano are turning to social media to get themselves home.

Half of Earth's trapped heat can't be found

Half the heat believed to have built up on Earth in recent years can't be accounted for.

MPIAA, RIAA call for draconian new anti-piracy measures

Movie companies and recording companies are calling for spyware to be installed on all computers to detect and delete pirated material.

Trojan blackmails Japanese porn-lovers

A new type of malware is humiliating porn-lovers in Japan by publishing their web history online and then blackmailing them.

Caller ID spoofing outlawed by Congress

The House of Representatives has passed a bill outlawing all caller ID spoofing "with the intent to defraud or deceive".

Comet McNaught was biggest yet

British scientists reckon they've identified the largest comet yet, using data from the ESA/NASA Ulysses spacecraft to measure the region of space disturbed by the its presence.

General Relativity fights off competing theory

Einstein famously said that no amount of experimentation would prove him right. But two new studies have backed up his General Theory of Relativity, and one significantly undermines a rival theory.

HP probed over Russian bribes

HP's offices in Moscow were raided yesterday as part of an investigation into bribery, tax evasion and money laundering, the Wall Street Journal says.

TV companies promise national mobile content service

A dozen of the US' largest TV broadcasters have teamed up to develop a national television service for mobile devices.

Organisations exaggerate costs of piracy, says GOA

Every year, piracy costs US industry as much as - well, it seems nobody knows how much after all. A report from the Government Accountability Office has concluded that it's near impossible to quantify.

Researchers mimic magnetic monopoles

Researchers from Imperial College London have for the first time created a structure that acts like a single pole of a magnet at room temperature.

Huge natural particle accelerators observed during storms

Giant natural particle accelerators are forming 40 km above the surface of the Earth during thunderstorms, according to a lightning researcher at the University of Bath.

Newly-discovered exoplanets found going backwards

ESO astronomers have discovered nine new exoplanets - and found that several are going the wrong way.

MIT improves wireless power delivery system

MIT researchers have discovered that a wireless electricity delivery technique they invented three years ago works better when it's used to charge multiple devices at the same time.