Researchers devise new, stretchable antenna for wearable health monitoring

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices.

Researchers take magnetic waves for a spin

Researchers at New York University have developed a method for creating and directing fast moving waves in magnetic fields that have the potential to enhance communication and information processing in computer chips and other consumer products.

Researchers reveal phrases that pay on Kickstarter

Researchers at Georgia Tech studying the burgeoning phenomenon of crowdfunding have learned that the language used in online fundraising hold surprisingly predictive power about the success of such campaigns.

Researchers point to digital gains in human recognition

Human beings are highly efficient at recognising familiar faces, even from very poor quality images. New research led by a psychologist at the University of York is using advances in the level of detail available in digital photography to harness this human ability for use in forensics.

Penn researchers grow liquid crystal 'flowers' that can be used as lenses

A team of material scientists, chemical engineers and physicists from the University of Pennsylvania has made another advance in their effort to use liquid crystals as a medium for assembling structures.

Researchers find a cause of aging that can be reversed

Medical researchers have found a cause of aging in animals that can be reversed, possibly paving the way for new treatments for age-related diseases including cancer, type 2 diabetes, muscle wasting and inflammatory diseases. The researchers hope to start human trials late next year.

Researchers use inkblots to improve security of online passwords

Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed a new password system that incorporates inkblots to provide an extra measure of protection when, as so often occurs, lists of passwords get stolen from websites.

NASA and international researchers obtain crucial data from meteoroid impact

A team of NASA and international scientists for the first time have gathered a detailed understanding of the effects on Earth from a small asteroid impact. The unprecedented data obtained as the result of the airburst of a meteoroid over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15, 2013, has revolutionized scientists' understanding of this natural phenomenon.

CU-Boulder researchers develop 4-D printing technology for composite materials

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have successfully added a fourth dimension to their printing technology, opening up exciting possibilities for the creation and use of adaptive, composite materials in manufacturing, packaging and biomedical applications.

MIT researchers optimize robot vision

Object recognition is one of the most widely studied problems in computer vision. But a robot that manipulates objects in the world needs to do more than just recognize them; it also needs to understand their orientation. Is that mug right-side up or upside-down? And which direction is its handle facing?

UCLA researchers double efficiency of novel solar cell

Nearly doubling the efficiency of a breakthrough photovoltaic cell they created last year, UCLA researchers have developed a two-layer, see-through solar film that could be placed on windows, sunroofs, smartphone displays and other surfaces to harvest energy from the sun.

Video: Disney computer models capture style and process of portrait artists

By monitoring artists as they sketch human faces, stroke by stroke, scientists at Disney Research, Pittsburgh, have built computer models that learn each artist's drawing style, how they use strokes and how they select features to highlight as they interpret a face into a portrait.

Report: Job seekers should check their privacy settings

Social media websites can be a boon for employers scoping out job applicants, and that’s bad news for certain groups of young people, according to a new Northwestern University study.

Study finds best way to develop argument skills

If you’ve ever read the comments on a website then you know that most people lack the ability to argue well. Let’s be honest, some of the arguments you’ve read are probably really dumb.

Verizon geezer rages against something unimportant

An outraged Verizon employee known as "Wade" recently announced that he was "drawing a line in the sand" against unqualified "criminals" masquerading as security researchers.