Graphene: the sexy, thin supermodel queen of the material world

It's really, really thin. It's tough as lead boots. It's sexy. It's graphene. And, the science world gets all hot and heavy when it is around. Brainiacs just love the super-material.  

NIST's new compact atomic clock design uses cold atoms to boost precision

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a compact atomic clock design that relies on cold rubidium atoms instead of the usual hot atoms, a switch that promises improved precision and stability.

Using NFC as a secure smart card reader

IBM scientists have developed a new mobile authentication security technology based on the radio standard known as near-field communication (NFC). The technology provides an extra layer of security when using an NFC-enabled device and a contact-less smart card to conduct mobile transactions.

Images stored in box of vapor

Giving a different meaning to data storage in the cloud, scientists have succeeded in storing a miniature movie in a room-teperature atomic vapor.

Light clocked going faster than light - sort of

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have worked out a way to produce light pulses that - in a way -  travel faster than the speed of light.

Atoms entangled using microwaves for first time

NIST physicists  have for the first time linked the quantum properties of two separated ions by manipulating them with microwaves instead of the usual laser beams.

Want to stay younger? Just don't go upstairs

It's not news that it happens - but it's rather amazing to be able to measure it. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been able to demonstrate that time passes faster just a foot above the ground.

NIST creates spray-on transistors

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is using organic semiconductors as a basis for spray-on large-area electronics such as solar cells and displays.

World's most accurate clock unveiled

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built the world's most accurate clock.