Scientists scale terahertz peaks in nanotubes

Carbon nanotubes carry plasmonic signals in the terahertz range of the electromagnetic spectrum, but only if they’re metallic by nature or doped. In new research, the Rice University laboratory of physicist Junichiro Kono disproved previous theories that dominant terahertz response comes from narrow-gap semiconducting nanotubes.

Scientists untangle nanotubes

Researchers have demonstrated how to produce electronic inks for the development of new applications using the 'wonder material', carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are lightweight, strong and conduct electricity, which make them ideal components in new electronics devices, such as tablet computers and touchscreen phones, but cannot be used without being separated out from their natural tangled state.

Unzipped nanotubes could be key to next-gen batteries

Researchers at Rice University have come up with a new way to boost the efficiency of the ubiquitous lithium ion (LI) battery by employing ribbons of graphene that start as carbon nanotubes.

Nanotube breakthrough promises replacement for silicon

IBM says it's made a big step towards the commercial production of carbon nanotube-based computer chips.

Meter-long nanotubes on the cards

Researchers have calculated that it should be perfectly possible to grow a perfect, meter-long single-walled carbon nanotube 50,000 times thinner than a human hair.

NASA material is blacker than black

NASA engineers have produced the blackest stuff ever created - a material that absorbs more than 99 percent of the ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and far-infrared light that hits it.

Tiny artificial muscles flex like elephant's trunk

An international team of researchers has invented minute artificial muscles that can rotate object a thousand times their own weight.

Team makes breakthrough in development of artificial brain

Researchers have built a synthetic synapse in work that could one day lead to a fully-functioning artificial brain.

MIT finds new way to make electricity

MIT researchers have discovered a completely new way of producing electricity - and they don't fully understand how it works.