Changing the future of nanotechnology

A new twist on a very old physics technique could have a profound impact on one of the most buzzed-about aspects of nanoscience. Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that their unique method of light-matter interaction analysis appears to be a good way of helping make better semiconductor nanowires.

This 1,600-Year-Old Goblet Shows that the Romans Were Nanotechnology Pioneers

The colorful secret of a 1,600-year-old Roman chalice at the British Museum is the key to a super­sensitive new technology that might help diagnose human disease or pinpoint biohazards at security checkpoints.The glass chalice, known as the Lycurgus Cup because it bears a scene involving King Lycurgus of ...

New technology to detect radioactive materials

Researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have created a new prototype radiation detection device for use at ports, border crossings, airports and elsewhere.

IBM maps electric charge in single molecule

Big Blue's long had a fascination with the tiny, and now IBM scientists have for the first time been able to measure how charge is distributed within a single molecule.

Paint-on solar cells could power homes

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have developed a 'solar paint' that could be slapped on the outside of a house to help generate power for the devices inside.

Scientists create a nanopatch for the heart

When you have a heart attack, a part of your heart dies. Specialized heart cells perish and you can never get them back.

Report: Graphene electronics have self-cooling capabilities

University of Illinois scientists have discovered that graphene transistors have a nanoscale cooling effect.

World's smallest Christmas card created

They're notably tight-fisted in Scotland, and now a group of engineers at Glasgow University have found a way to potentially slash postage costs - they've created the world's smallest Christmas card.

Battery of the future not yet assembled.

The average consumer of electronic devices wishes for a longer lasting, rechargeable battery that gives them more charges. Nanotechnology that is already being used in most conventional batteries and new research could give birth to a tiny generation of rechargeable batteries that hold more energy than ever before.

Would you eat artificially grown meat?

Would you eat meat grown in vats? No? Well, how about if you were really hungry? What could be better than a nice juicy cheeseburger with fries? 

And does it really matter whether the meat was raised, grown or cloned?



Nanotechnology expert found dead in Boston University lab

Boston University computer engineering professor Francesco Cerrina was found dead yesterday morning inside an unattended lab on campus.

Smart medical dressing diagnoses and treats infection

A new 'smart' medical dressing uses nanotechnology to both detect and treat infection in wounds.

UCLA develops holographic, cell phone-powered microscope

Scientists are going to perform research on HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, with the help of a cell phone and a brand new kind of microscope.

Self-assembling nanodevices can move and change shape on demand

A Harvard-led team has created nanodevices made of DNA that self-assemble and can be programmed to move and change shape. They're perfect for medical applications, says the team, because DNA is biocompatible and biodegradable.

Copper nanowires promise cheap, flexible screens

Imagine a foldable iPad: it's perfectly possible, say Duke University scientists, who have found a simple way to make tiny copper nanowires in quantity.

'Nanospider' robots could target disease

Researchers have created and programmed robots the size of single molecules that can move independently and even make tiny products themselves.

Logic chips built from DNA

A Duke University engineer says he can produce more simple logic circuits in a day than the world's entire monthly output of silicon chips.

Printable RFID tags could eliminate checkout queues

We could soon all be strolling past the checkout with a cartful of goods, thanks to the development of new, printable, nano-based RFID tags.