Can lightning power smartphones?

Lightning is what happens when there’s so much electricity built up in the clouds, it has no where to go but down. OK that’s a highly simplified explanation, but still pretty accurate. No matter how you explain it, lightning is a dangerous but powerful explosion of energy, one that up until recently, man had no way to harness.

Apple loses the plot on accessories front

It appears that Apple's moves to take control of its accessories market moving from a 30-pin connector to the Lightning connector has backfired completely.

Lightning may be linked to headaches and migraines

University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers have determined that lightning could affect the onset of both typical headaches and migraines.

Apple's Lightning cable cloned

A Chinese company says it's been able to crack the microchip inside Apple's Lightning cable, allowing it to sell a low-cost version of the cable and dock.

Mysterious 'sprites' caught on film

The strange bursts of lightning known as sprites, which flash red, white or green 50 miles above Earth during thunderstorms, are very rarely seen.

Blue lightning spotted in Saturn storm

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has spotted lightning on Saturn in broad daylight, as part of a massive storm last year.

Pentagon wants a lightning gun

Lightning guns are often thought of as weapons of science fiction, relegated to the pages of magazines, movie screens and video games.

A new source of energy: tapping electricity from the air

Brazilian scientists believe they have found a way of tapping electricity direct from the air - and preventing lightning strikes at the same time.

Ball lightning could be hallucination, say physicists

Ball lightning may be all in the mind, according to scientists at the University of Innsbruck.

Dell Windows Phone 7 details leaked

People are getting so careless with their smartphones! At least poor Gray Powell only lost one, but the folks at Dell have managed to lose track of five - or the marketing bumf for them, anyway.

Huge natural particle accelerators observed during storms

Giant natural particle accelerators are forming 40 km above the surface of the Earth during thunderstorms, according to a lightning researcher at the University of Bath.