New painkiller offers no side effects or addictive qualities

An astonishing new painkiller has been developed at Stony Brook University. It boasts no side effects or addictive qualities and could be ready for consumption within a year or two.

Analysis: New obesity research shows U.S. eating habits need to change

A new scientific study on obesity in young American children has brought more depressing news. It appears we now are starting our children on the path to obesity before they can even eat solid foods.

New genome sequence could make finest chocolate better

Chocolate: the finer the better. Fortunately, the recent sequencing and assembly of the chocolate tree genome is likely to benefit chocolate lovers and producers all over the world.

Grow your own transplant - a possibility for men with diabetes

Men that have type 1 diabetes might be able to grow insulin-producing cells from their testicular tissue.

Humans and sea sponges more alike than not

A surprised team of international scientists recently discovered that sea sponges - one of Earth's oldest life forms - share almost 70 percent of the same genes as human beings.

MIT laser camera sees around corners

MIT researchers have developed a camera capable of capturing images of objects that are not in its direct line of sight.

T. Rex had more than junk in its trunk

Paleontologists used to believe Tyrannosaurus Rex was a monstrous and slow scavenger. But now a Canadian researcher has hypothesized that the dinosaur was actually a very fast and efficient killing machine.

ASU biologist: Anti-microbial products dangerous, don’t work

Thanks to the abundance of medical fear mongering in America, people are obsessed with killing microorganisms. Antimicrobial compounds are the weapons of choice, but a biologist at Arizona State University is saying they are unsafe and don’t work.

European scientists confirm reading is good for brains

A European study has confirmed what most people already knew. Being able to read is good for your brain.

URI scientists to harness solar energy from pavement for practical use

The heat that pavement gives off is something everyone is familiar with. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island are exploring how this radiant heat energy can be used to melt ice, power streetlights, illuminate signs, heat buildings and generally make our lives better.

URI scientists to harness solar energy from pavement for practical use

The heat that pavement gives off is something everyone is familiar with. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island are exploring how this radiant heat energy can be used to melt ice, power streetlights, illuminate signs, heat buildings and generally make our lives better.

New study: Males might be more "disposable" than females

Scientists may have recently figured out why women tend to live longer than men. A new study set to be published this month in Scientific American says that males could be genetically more disposable than females.

World's most accurate clock unveiled

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built the world's most accurate clock.

'Vegetative' patient communicates via brain scan

Patients in a so-called vegetative state have been shown to be conscious, and one has been enabled to communicate via an MRI scan.

Nanoparticles can strip out human cancer cells

Scientists have successfully used magnetic nanoparticles to capture and remove cancer cells from human tissue.

Why John Wayne always won

It's gunfight time at the University of Birmingham, where scientists have been investigating how quick people are off the draw.

Heavy internet use linked to depression

Take a deep breath, count to ten and pull yourself together. And turn that damned machine off.

New compound fights multiple viruses

A new broad spectrum antiviral could be used against HIV-1, Nipah, Ebola and other deadly viruses.

The World is disappearing, says NASA

The World is gradually melting away, according to the latest pictures from NASA's Earth Observatory.

Spiderman device could let people walk up walls

You too can walk up walls like Spiderman, thanks to a new device invented by Cornell scientists.