These electronics dissolve when triggered

A medical device, once its job is done, could harmlessly melt away inside a person’s body. Or, a military device could collect and send its data and then dissolve away, leaving no trace of an intelligence mission. Or, an environmental sensor could collect climate information, then wash away in the rain.

Discovery of new semiconductor holds promise for 2D physics and electronics

From super-lubricants, to solar cells, to the fledgling technology of valleytronics, there is much to be excited about with the discovery of a unique new two-dimensional semiconductor, rhenium disulfide, by researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry. Rhenium disulfide, unlike molybdenum disulfide and other dichalcogenides, behaves electronically as if it were a 2D monolayer even as a 3D bulk material.

Creating a graphene-metal sandwich to improve electronics

Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene “sandwich” strongly enhances the heat conducting properties of copper, a discovery that could further help in the downscaling of electronics.

Vibration energy the secret to self-powered electronics

A multi-university team of engineers has developed what could be a promising solution for charging smartphone batteries on the go — without the need for an electrical cord.

New quantum dots herald a new era of electronics operating on a single-atom level

New types of solotronic structures, including the world's first quantum dots containing single cobalt ions, have been created and studied at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw. The materials and elements used to form these structures allow us forecast new trends in solotronics – a field of experimental electronics and spintronics of the future, based on operations occurring on a single-atom level.

Eye-catching electronics

Researchers at ETH are developing electronic components that are thinner and more flexible than before. They can even be wrapped around a single hair without damaging the electronics. This opens up new possibilities for ultra-thin, transparent sensors that are literally easy on the eye.

Electronics advance moves closer to a world beyond silicon

Researchers in the College of Engineering at Oregon State University have made a significant advance in the function of metal-insulator-metal, or MIM diodes, a technology premised on the assumption that the speed of electrons moving through silicon is simply too slow.

$70 Drone Shield wants to protect you from flying spies

There are quite a lot of people who are seriously concerned about maintaining their privacy in an age where aerial drones - like the Parrot AR - are increasingly easy to build or buy.

FAA pushed to let people play with their gizmos, aloft

We would cautiously propose that accidentally leaving your phone on doesn't frequently make planes fall from the sky, but now the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is reportedly considering letting passengers keep their electronics on.

Darpa looks to self-destruct devices

We're all used to seeing self-destructing messages in the movies; in real life, not so much. And Darpa, understandably, would prefer to avoid Hollywood's alternative method of disposing of redundant communications devices or sensors by eating them.

This mobile workstation is powered by a Raspberry Pi

We've seen the uber-mino Raspberry Pi power a wide variety of DIY projects, including the aptly named Lappi which transformed the popular dev board into a rather bulky laptop.

This Hummingbird board is pre-Arduino

Hummingbird is targered at precocious young modders - but we want one anyways.

Android powers this car infotainment system

Parrot is a tech company that most famously manufactures the AR.Drone. However, Bluetooth and flying toys isn't all Parrot's about.

Is graphene ready to replace silicon?

For the first time, semiconductors have been produced from graphene - a potential revolution for the electronics market. The Norwegian developers say products could be on the market in as little as five years.

Dissolvable electronics do their job, then disappear

Researchers have developed tiny electronic devices that can be used in medical implants and which melt right away when they're finished with.

'Rubber-band' electronics could aid human health

Researchers say they've developed electronic devices that are as stretchable as a rubber band, making them potentially implantable into the human body for medical monitoring.

MIT announces free online courses

MIT's announced plans for a fully-online electronics course open to anyone in the world - and completely free.

ASUS tops Greenpeace eco-league

ASUS is the greenest notebook manufacturer, according to Greenpeace, which has released a report on the most environmentally-friendly computers, monitors, phones and televisions.

Consumer electronic spending plummets as recession worsens

The US consumer electronics (CE) market has been hit disproportionately hard by the Great Recession, with households projected to spend 17% less on CE in 2010 than the previous year.

Japanese scientists design mind-reading robots

Japanese scientists are preparing to develop "mind-reading" robots and consumer electronics that can be controlled by thought.