Report: Radiation damage at the root of Chernobyl’s ecosystems

Radiological damage to microbes near the site of the Chernobyl disaster has slowed the decomposition of fallen leaves and other plant matter in the area, according to a study just published in the journal Oecologia. The resulting buildup of dry, loose detritus is a wildfire hazard that poses the threat of spreading radioactivity from the Chernobyl area.

Comparing Fukushima to the cold light of Chernobyl

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster spread significant radioactive contamination over more than 3500 square miles of the Japanese mainland in the spring of 2011. Now several recently published studies of Chernobyl, directed by Timothy Mousseau of the University of South Carolina and Anders Møller of the Université Paris-Sud, are bringing a new focus on just how extensive the long-term effects on Japanese wildlife might be.

Rat blamed for Japanese nuclear disaster

Tepco, the operator of the ill-fated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant might have found the culprit responsible for the plant’s partial meltdown and it has four legs and a wiggly tail. 

Nuclear accidents likely 'every ten to twenty years'

Catastrophic nuclear accidents such as the core meltdowns at Chernobyl and Fukushima are 200 times more likely to happen than previously believed, say scientists.

After nuclear disasters, wildlife thrives

Radiation from nuclear disasters such as Chernobyl and Fukushima may, surprisingly, have done the local wildlife no harm at all.

Can games help experts manage disasters?


Over the past few weeks, Japan has been grappling with the aftermath of a tragic 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which killed thousands of people.

Nuclear blast site Chernobyl to open for tourists

For nearly 25 years, the Ukranian government has prohibited any non-authorized individual from visiting the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, due to radiation concerns that still exist. However, that's soon going to change.