Occupy Flash wants to kill browser plug-in

Posted by Emma Woollacott

In a blatant example of bandwagon-jumping, a group of developers opposed to Adobe's Flash plug-in web browser has decided to call itself 'Occupy Flash'.

The group isn't camping out outside Adobe's San Jose headquarters, but has shown its dedication to the cause by, er, creating a website. It's calling on users to uninstall or disable Flash, and for developers to ignore it.

"Flash Player is dead. Its time has passed. It's buggy. It crashes a lot. It requires constant security updates. It doesn't work on most mobile devices. It's a fossil, left over from the era of closed standards and unilateral corporate control of web technology," says the group in its manifesto.

"Websites that rely on Flash present a completely inconsistent (and often unusable) experience for fast-growing percentage of the users who don't use a desktop browser. It introduces some scary security and privacy issues by way of Flash cookies. Flash makes the web less accessible. At this point, it's holding back the web."

Just over a week ago, Adobe officially called a halt to Flash development for mobile devices, saying that it planned instead to focus on mobile apps and HTML. However, it's still pushing Flash for the desktop.

The group admits that it's trying to piggyback on the Occupy protests sweeping the US and Europe.

"This campaign is in no way meant to belittle the efforts of the more important Occupy movements currently going on. We understand we are fairly shamelessly co-opting populist terminology," it says.

"And for that matter, we're not really occupying anything. More like evicting. Or banishing. Regardless, we love the idea of normal people taking on big corporations in the interest of the population at large."

Unfortunately for Occupy Flash, it's not the only group that can shamelessly co-opt someone else's idea. It's already been copied - right down to the logo and website design - by another group calling itself Occupy HTML.

"Championing simplistic statements regarding web technologies makes the web less educated," it proclaims. "Stop the fight!"