Hubble magnifies the distant universe

Galaxy clusters are some of the most massive structures that can be found in the Universe — large groups of galaxies bound together by gravity.

Cleaner NASA rover sees its shadow in Martian spring

Late afternoon lighting produced a dramatic shadow of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity photographed by the rover's rear hazard-avoidance camera on March 20, 2014.

Report: Molecules offer cleaner, milder way to break down natural gas

Scientists have discovered inexpensive materials that can convert natural gas into useful chemicals under mild conditions, a new study in the 14 March issue of the journal Science reports. This approach may eventually compete with technologies for generating the same chemicals from petroleum, a fossil fuel that emits a lot of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere when it burns.

Great earthquakes, water under pressure, high risk

The largest earthquakes occur where oceanic plates move beneath continents. Obviously, water trapped in the boundary between both plates has a dominant influence on the earthquake rupture process.

Revolutionary solar cells double as lasers

Commercial silicon-based solar cells - such as those seen on the roofs of houses across the country - operate at about 20% efficiency for converting the Sun's rays into electrical energy. It's taken over 20 years to achieve that rate of efficiency.

Study finds gaming augments players’ social lives

New research finds that online social behavior isn’t replacing offline social behavior in the gaming community. Instead, online gaming is expanding players’ social lives. The study was done by researchers at North Carolina State University, York University and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology.

A new angle on controlling light

Light waves can be defined by three fundamental characteristics: their color (or wavelength), polarization, and direction. While it has long been possible to selectively filter light according to its color or polarization, selectivity based on the direction of propagation has remained elusive.

Mars yard ready for Red Planet rover

A state-of-the-art ‘Mars yard’ is now ready to put the ExoMars rover through its paces before the vehicle is launched to the Red Planet in 2018.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope spots Mars-bound comet sprout multiple jets

How do you grow a supermassive black hole that is a million to a billion times the mass of our sun? Astronomers do not know the answer, but a new study using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, has turned up what might be the cosmic seeds from which a black hole will sprout. The results are helping scientists piece together the evolution of supermassive black holes -- powerful objects that dominate the hearts of all galaxies.

Sony's digital paper E Ink slate priced at $1100



Sony introduced its high-end, 13-inch slate for reading and writing documents back in 2013.

Rosetta sets sights on destination comet

The Rosetta spacecraft has caught a first glimpse of its destination comet since waking up from deep-space hibernation on Jan. 20.

Computing with slime

A future computer might be a lot slimier than the solid silicon devices we have today. In a study published in the journal Materials Today, European researchers reveal details of logic units built using living slime molds, which might act as the building blocks for computing devices and sensors.

The dynamics behind Arctic ecosystems

The climate – combined with the body size of the herbivores – is crucial for how the tundra’s ecosystem works. This is shown in new research, which is also the first step towards a general understanding of ecosystems on land.

A more potent greenhouse gas than CO2, methane emissions will leap as Earth warms

While carbon dioxide is typically painted as the bad boy of greenhouse gases, methane is roughly 30 times more potent as a heat-trapping gas.

Paramount Showcases Transformers and Reveals the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

This is going to be one hell of a summer for geeks, especially considering we’ve got Transformers: Age of Extinction, and Godzilla coming up. In fact, Mark Wahlberg is so excited to be part of Transformers, he’s already proclaimed it will be “the biggest movie of 2014.” 

Mike Judge Is Back With Silicon Valley

Mike Judge, the creator of Beavis and Butthead, Office Space, and King of the Hill, is back with a goof on Silicon Valley, which is called, you guessed it, Silicon Valley. You may have seen the ads for it already, and it has the cast wearing black turtle necks, doing their best Steve Jobs poses.  

Hellboy Gets His Day

No Hellboy doesn’t need any time off for a vacation, but he was given a day that celebrated the beloved graphic novel character’s twentieth anniversary, and Mike Mignola, who created Hellboy, couldn’t have been more thrilled. 

Captain America: The Winter Solider is Apparently a Winner

These days, fans expect a sequel to a film to be at least as good as the first installment, forget about better than the original. And it looks like the latest Captain America film is at least as good, if not better, than the first. 

The Gaming and Racism Debate

The debate about the destructive qualities of games should continue for a long time. Many times when a national tragedy occurs, video games and violent movies are often blamed, and now a study claims that gaming can encourage racism.

Rumors of a Pacific Rim Sequel Won't Die Down

There have been rumors and speculation about a sequel to Pacific Rim for quite some time, but the question has always been did the movie make enough money that a sequel would be a good investment? While reviews were mixed, the fans definitely liked the film, and maybe the cult of Pacific Rim would grow big enough that by the time a sequel would be ready, a whole new audience would possibly be waiting for it as well.