Odds that global warming is due to natural factors? Slim to none

An analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth's climate, according to a new study by McGill University physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

Apple's 2014 roadmap gets outlined



KGI securities analyst Ming Chi Kuo has published a rough outline of Apple's 2014 roadmap, which includes a lower-cost iMac, an upgraded iPad Air/iPad Mini, new iWatch (in two sizes) and a 4.7-inch/5.5-inch iPhone.

Researchers bolster development of programmable quantum computers

University of Chicago researchers and their colleagues at University College London have performed a proof-of-concept experiment that will aid the future development of programmable quantum computers.

Construction to begin on NASA spacecraft set to visit asteroid in 2018

NASA's team that will conduct the first U.S. mission to collect samples from an asteroid has been given the go-ahead to begin building the spacecraft, flight instruments and ground system, and launch support facilities.

Faraway moon or faint star? NASA says possible exomoon found

Titan, Europa, Io and Phobos are just a few members of our solar system's pantheon of moons. Are there are other moons out there, orbiting planets beyond our sun?

NASA's Hubble extends stellar tape measure 10x farther into space

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers now can precisely measure the distance of stars up to 10,000 light-years away -- 10 times farther than previously possible.

SU plays key role in search for elusive dark matter

Physicist Richard Schnee hopes to find traces of dark matter by studying particles with low masses and interaction rates, some of which have never been probed before. The ongoing search for invisible dark matter is the subject of a recent article involving physicists from Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences.

Into the abyss: Scientists explore one of Earth's deepest ocean trenches

What lives in the deepest part of the ocean--the abyss? A team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) will use the world's only full-ocean-depth, hybrid, remotely-operated vehicle, Nereus, and other advanced technology to find out. They will explore the Kermadec Trench at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean.

Sunlight generates hydrogen in new porous silicon

Porous silicon manufactured in a bottom up procedure using solar energy can be used to generate hydrogen from water, according to a team of Penn State mechanical engineers, who also see applications for batteries, biosensors and optical electronics as outlets for this new material.

Asus Transformer Pad TF103C gets detailed



Asus is reportedly prepping a new 10-inch Android tablet featuring Intel's 64-bit Bay Trail SoC (Z3745) and a detachable keyboard dock. 


NASA's LRO Mission and North America to experience total lunar eclipse

When people in North America look up at the sky in the early morning hours of April 15, they can expect the moon to look a little different. A total lunar eclipse is expected at this time, a phenomenon that occurs when the Earth, moon and sun are in perfect alignment, blanketing the moon in the Earth's shadow.

Images from NASA Mars Rover include bright spots

Images taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on April 2 and April 3 include bright spots, which might be due to the sun glinting off a rock or cosmic rays striking the camera's detector.

Report: Gusev Crater on Mars once held a lake

If desert mirages occur on Mars, "Lake Gusev" belongs among them. This come-and-go body of ancient water has come and gone more than once, at least in the eyes of Mars scientists.

Growing crops on photovoltaic farms

Growing agave and other carefully chosen plants amid photovoltaic panels could allow solar farms not only to collect sunlight for electricity but also to produce crops for biofuels, according to new computer models by Stanford scientists.

How to make ethanol without corn or other plants

Stanford University scientists have found a new, highly efficient way to produce liquid ethanol from carbon monoxide gas. This promising discovery could provide an eco-friendly alternative to conventional ethanol production from corn and other crops, say the scientists. Their results are published in the April 9 advanced online edition of the journal Nature.

Scientists develop bacterial ‘FM Radio’

Programming living cells offers the prospect of harnessing sophisticated biological machinery for transformative applications in energy, agriculture, water remediation and medicine. Inspired by engineering, researchers in the emerging field of synthetic biology have designed a tool box of small genetic components that act as intracellular switches, logic gates, counters and oscillators.

Report: Movies synchronize minds

When we watch a movie, our brains react to it immediately in a way similar to other people's brains.

Did life as we know it originate in deep sea vents?

One of the greatest mysteries facing humans is how life originated on Earth. Scientists have determined approximately when life began (roughly 3.8 billion years ago), but there is still intense debate about exactly how life began. One possibility has grown in popularity in the last two decades - that simple metabolic reactions emerged near ancient seafloor hot springs, enabling the leap from a non-living to a living world.

Understanding the convoluted Windows path: How did it get so screwed up?

Windows XP is now officially obsolete. The OS is a malware magnet, yet Microsoft dropped support for it this month. A lot of folks are, or shortly will be, screwed.

Report: Lenovo prepping new high-end ThinkPad tablet


Lenovo is reportedly prepping a new, high-end Windows tablet equipped with Intel's Atom Bay processor, a 1.6 GHz quad-core chip with burst speeds up to 2.39 MHz.