Falling WiMax chipset prices spell good news for adoption rates

Product launches to drive strong handset growth in H2 2008, says research firm

MIT develops iShoe to keep you on your feet

You may not need MIT’s iShoe technology now, but at a certain point in your life you are likely to be grateful for the technology Erez Lieberman is working on. His iShoe is able to detect balance problems in your feet to prevent future falls.  

Undersea volcanic rocks offer storage for greenhouse gases

A group of scientists has conducted experiments utilizing deep ocean-floor drilling to show that volcanic rocks located off of the West Coast of the U.S. and in other areas could potentially be capable of securely capturing and storing large amounts of global-warming causing carbon dioxide that is captured from power plants and other sources. According to the scientists, natural chemical reactions under 30,000 square miles of ocean floor off of the coast of Oregon, California, Washington and British Columbia could potentially be capable of trapping as much as 150 years worth of U.S. carbon dioxide production.

Volkswagen unveils 2028 concept vehicles

Green Art: Designers create PhotoBioReactor sculpture

DRAM contract price to remain flat in July

Solar inverter market to grow by 40% in 2008

Dubai building the ultimate sustainable city

Dubai is building perhaps the world’s ultimate sustainable city.  Xeritown is the country’s latest project and is a 60-acre town composed of dense urban clusters and built along a north-south axis that will take advantage of the cool breezes that blow in from the ocean.

Notebook battery makers set for positive growth in H2 of year

GTX 200 prices crashing, Nvidia said to be shifting strategy

Pricewatch – There is trouble in Nvidialand. AMD’s new graphics cards apparently have surprised Nvidia, forcing the company to cut the prices of its new cards. Sources told TG Daily that Nvidia is adjusting its marketing strategy to GeForce 8800 cards to avoid what has all the signs for a big sales decline on the high end. Of course, that means that it is a good time for graphics cards shoppers. Here’s some insight in what you can expect to find on the market.

Blu-ray players taking aim at $300

As Microsoft announces a $299 Xbox 360, we are noticing Blu-ray player prices diving as well and distancing themselves from the Blu-ray-equipped Playstation 3 for the very first time. Patience and luck may get you a $300 Blu-ray player in the not too distant future.

Man claims to create almost limitless fuel from farm waste

A Baytown Texas man claims he can extract almost limitless amounts of fuel from regular farm waste.  John Rivera, the Chairman of Sustainable Power Corporation, says his “reactors” can convert waste like leftover feed, beans, rice, husks and grains into bio-fuel or what he calls “Vetroleum”.  The Vetroleum can then be further refined into other fuels like gasoline or even jet fuel.  Rivera claims 60 pounds of waste can produce nearly six gallons of fuel.

Poker bot beats human champs

iPhone launch turns into iBrick disaster

Apple’s much anticipated 3G iPhone launch turned into a massive disaster after the company’s iTunes authentication server went down from the high volume of traffic.  People who had waited hours, even days, in line were told to go home to activate their phones after in-store activations began taking 30 to 45 minutes.  In many cases, Apple employees just gave up.

Panels for OLED TVs and mini-note PCs to show strongest growth through 2015, says DisplaySearch

Weak PND market worries GPS chip suppliers

Toyota will start making hybrid Prius in U.S.

Fake Steve Jobs hanging up the keyboard

Daniel Lyons, the man behind the Fake Steve Jobs blog, is hanging up his keyboard and heading to bigger and better things.  In his last post, titled “I’m sailing away”, Fake Steve says Real Dan was given administrative access to the blog and has now locked out fake Steve.  But Lyons assures loyal fans that Fake Steve isn’t completely going away.

Researchers dive into invisible light and the origins of the universe

Physicists at Rutgers University, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the State University of New York at Buffalo have developed a nano-sized electronic circuit, which can detect light invisible to the human eye and today’s radio telescopes, opening an opportunity to analyze the greatest portion of the light emitted since the “big bang” and gain insights into the earliest stages of star and galaxy formation almost 14 billion years ago.