Changing the future of nanotechnology

A new twist on a very old physics technique could have a profound impact on one of the most buzzed-about aspects of nanoscience. Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that their unique method of light-matter interaction analysis appears to be a good way of helping make better semiconductor nanowires.

Hubble witnesses an asteroid mysteriously disintegrating

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has photographed the never-before-seen break-up of an asteroid, which has fragmented into as many as ten smaller pieces. Although fragile comet nuclei have been seen to fall apart as they approach the Sun, nothing like the breakup of this asteroid, P/2013 R3, has ever been observed before in the asteroid belt.

Chandra and XMM-Newton provide direct measurement of distant black hole's spin

Astronomers have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton to show a supermassive black hole six billion light years from Earth is spinning extremely rapidly. This first direct measurement of the spin of such a distant black hole is an important advance for understanding how black holes grow over time.

Mystery of planet-forming disks explained by magnetism

Astronomers say that magnetic storms in the gas orbiting young stars may explain a mystery that has persisted since before 2006.

Report: New catalyst could lead to cleaner energy

MIT chemists have devised a way to trap carbon dioxide and transform it into useful organic compounds, using a simple metal complex.

Energy efficiency bill wins bi-partisan support

The strangest of things took place in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday: The House of Representatives passed apparently meaningful energy-related legislation with true bipartisan support.

Making gadgets smaller, faster and more efficient

University of Cincinnati researchers are discovering how to manipulate light to one day better view the world’s tiniest objects through a super-lens, as well as how to hide an object in plain sight.

NASA tests new robotic refueling technologies

NASA has successfully concluded a remotely controlled test of new technologies that would empower future space robots to transfer hazardous oxidizer – a type of propellant – into the tanks of satellites in space today.

Non-uniform climate warming affects terrestrial carbon cycle and ecosystems

A recent University of Oklahoma study of five decades of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggests the impact of seasonal diurnal or daily warming varies between global regions affecting many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation.

Galactic gas stations

Future lunar missions may be fueled by gas stations in space, according to MIT engineers: A spacecraft might dock at a propellant depot, somewhere between the Earth and the moon, and pick up extra rocket fuel before making its way to the lunar surface.

Claim: Bright pulses of light could make space veggies more nutritious

Exposing leafy vegetables grown during spaceflight to a few bright pulses of light daily could increase the amount of eye-protecting nutrients produced by the plants, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Building a smart grid for an electric vehicle fleet

Being able to charge up to 30 electric cars at once requires some ingenious energy management. Researchers are incorporating a mix of renewables into the design of a smart grid for Germany’s largest charging station.

Warren Buffett loves wind power

The Oracle of Omaha sure loves wind power. Of course, Warren Buffett invests to make money, so the continuing wind plays by companies in his Berkshire Hathaway empire are really a sign of the sector’s economic attractiveness.

NASA's Hubble finds life is too fast, furious for runaway galaxy

The spiral galaxy ESO 137-001 looks like a dandelion caught in a breeze in this new Hubble Space Telescope image.

Spiral galaxy spills blood and guts

This new Hubble image shows spiral galaxy ESO 137-001, framed against a bright background as it moves through the heart of galaxy cluster Abell 3627. This cluster is violently ripping the spiral’s entrails out into space, leaving bright blue streaks as telltale clues to this cosmic crime.

Report: Sea ice being lost at a rate of five days per decade

The melt season across the Arctic is getting longer by five days per decade, according to new research from a team including Prof Julienne Stroeve (Professor of Polar Observation and Modelling at UCL Earth Sciences).

Is infrared a new renewable energy source?

When the sun sets on a remote desert outpost and solar panels shut down, what energy source will provide power through the night? A battery, perhaps, or an old diesel generator? Perhaps something strange and new.

Transparent, color solar cells fuse energy, beauty

Colorful, see-through solar cells invented at the University of Michigan could one day be used to make stained-glass windows, decorations and even shades that turn the sun's energy into electricity.

Is the South a wind-power dead zone?

t’s a common reaction among those taking their first look at the U.S.Geological Survey’s new interactive map that depicts the location of every utility-scale wind turbine in the country: Whaddup down South?

Nanoparticle networks' design enhanced by theory

For close to two decades, Cornell scientists have developed processes for using polymers to self-assemble inorganic nanoparticles into porous structures that could revolutionize electronics, energy and more.