Weird and wonderful: top ten new species announced

A deep-sea worm that fires luminous bombs and a snigger-worthy fungus are among the top ten new species for 2009 picked by the International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University and an international committee of taxonomists.

Venter team creates first synthetic living cell

In what is being hailed as the greatest scientific breakthrough in a generation, researchers have created the first artificial living cell.

Kevin Costner dances with oil spills

Kevin Costner may be too old to dance with the wolves, but he is apparently young enough to help clean up a disastrous oil spill off the Louisiana coast.

Artificial butterfly filmed in flight

A group of Japanese researchers have created a fully functioning replica - or ornithopter - of a swallowtail butterfly to demonstrate its flight mechanism.

Phillips touts 12 watt LED bulb as incandescent replacement

Phillips has introduced a 12 watt LED bulb that could eventually replace the ubiquitous 60 watt incandescent bulb.

Ball lightning could be hallucination, say physicists

Ball lightning may be all in the mind, according to scientists at the University of Innsbruck.

Heavy phone use may cause cancer

A ten-year study into whether or not mobile phones cause brain tumors has concluded... maybe.

'Nanospider' robots could target disease

Researchers have created and programmed robots the size of single molecules that can move independently and even make tiny products themselves.

Team uses whole islands to test survival of the fittest

For some people, fruit flies and a tank just aren't enough. Two Dartmouth biologists have been using whole islands in the Caribbean to investigate evolution in lizards.

Awesome research says, Working overtime bad for you

People who work three or more hours longer than a normal, seven-hour day have a 60% higher chance of heart disease.

Logic chips built from DNA

A Duke University engineer says he can produce more simple logic circuits in a day than the world's entire monthly output of silicon chips.

Neanderthal genome sequenced - and they interbred with us

Scientists have sequenced the complete Neanderthal genome, and discovered that modern humans are as much as two percent Neanderthal ourselves, thanks to comparatively recent interbreeding.

Plasma TV, GPS, DirecTV engineers inducted to hall of fame

The inventors of modern-day GPS and an inventor credited with paving the path for plasma TV technology are among the 2010 inductees to the Consumer Electronics Hall of Fame.

Ash could continue to ground planes, says expert

Air travelers could be in for a lot more emergency landings over the coming months thanks to the Icelandic volcano, an aviation expert has said. Stephen Wright of the University of Leeds believes the impact of volcanic ash on airplane air-conditioning systems could be serious, and could start to show up over the next few weeks.

Personal genetic medicine comes a step closer

A Stanford University professor has sequenced his entire genome in just two weeks, and for a cost of less than $50,000.

New chip stores a billion pages in one square inch

A North Carolina State University professor has developed a computer chip that can store an  an entire library’s worth of information.

Molecular computer mimics human brain

A team of researchers from Japan and Michigan Technological University has built a massively parallel molecular computer.

Software lets driver control car with eye movements

A German team has developed software that lets drivers steer simply by looking in the direction they want to go.

Ancient asphalt domes 'like an artificial reef'

WHOI scientists have discovered a group of giant asphalt domes under the sea off Santa Barbara, California.

Japanese scientists design mind-reading robots

Japanese scientists are preparing to develop "mind-reading" robots and consumer electronics that can be controlled by thought.