Russian scientists awarded Nobel for discovery of graphene

Two Russian scientists have won the Nobel Prize for Physics for their work developing graphene.

MIT develops mirror that tells you how healthy you are

You may feel that your mirror already gives you more information than you really want first thing in the morning.

Cardiac care goes wireless

Doctors may soon be able to remotely monitor cardiac activity by simply implanting a micro-electromechanical sensor in post-surgery heart patients.

Work makes you miserable - or that's what your phone says

People are happiest at home, and most miserable at work - that's the conclusion of a new study which tracks people’s emotional behaviour through their mobile phones.

What animal is that? Hold on, I'll check the barcode

One of the biggest problems in cataloguing species is being able to tell whether a specimen is actually new or not. This week, for example, a sea eagle that had been believed to belong to a new species was discovered to be simply a variant on a known type.

Global Hawk flies through the eye of the storm

NASA pilots have successfully flown an unmanned Global Hawk aircraft through the eye of several hurricanes.

Lockheed Martin builds DNA lab on a single chip

Lockheed Martin and ZyGEM have developed an advanced DNA analysis system powered by a single, small processor.

Want to stay younger? Just don't go upstairs

It's not news that it happens - but it's rather amazing to be able to measure it. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been able to demonstrate that time passes faster just a foot above the ground.

Perception of science shows continental divide

Science isn't an international language after all, according to a new survey. On the contrary, when people from different cultures read the same article, they can come away with completely different opinions.

Nvidia GPUs boost molecular biology research

Dr. Klaus Schulten of the University of Illinois is tapping GPU-powered computing to increase the speed and accuracy of microscopy-based simulations.

Strong winds could have parted Red Sea for Moses

A new computer model has indicated that the parting of the Red Sea could really have taken place - if the winds were right.

Sensor can send back data from the heart of a volcano

Chucking a radio transmitter into the heart of a volcano might seem a pretty fruitless endeavor. But a team at Newcastle University says it's developed a device that can withstand temperatures of up to 900 degrees C and which could provide early warning of an eruption.

Ground-breaking project aims to map the human brain

In a initiative being compared to the Human Genome Project, neuroscientists are attempting to map all the major circuits in the human brain.

Women and socialists understand science better

Women have a better understanding of science than men, and are more likely to heed the expert view that man-made global warming is taking place.

Artificial skin could give robots a lighter touch

Two US teams have developed artificial skins that are sensitive enough to detect the touch of a butterfly.       

Laws of physics 'vary throughout the universe'

Australian and British astrophysicists say they have found evidence that the laws of physics are different in different parts of the universe.

Team teaches robots to deceive

Researchers have been playing hide-and-seek with robots to help them develop the ability to deceive. 

'Tractor beam' moves objects a (relatively) long way

Star Trek tractor beams have existed for some time, but have only been able to move tiny objects for very short distances.

God to Stephen Hawking: Really? That's all you've got?

Ironically, by disputing God, Hawking may get us all killed by God.

Nanofluid tapped to cool servers

Scientists at Sweden's Institute of Technology have developed a nanofluid solution that could eventually be used to cool massive data centers and server farms.