A single gene may have shaped human cerebral cortex

The size and shape of the human cerebral cortex - responsible for all conscious thought - is largely determined by mutations in a single gene.

European stem-cell research under threat

Leading medical scientists say they are appalled by a ruling from a French judge that they say threatens the development of embryonic stem cell-based therapies.

Parts of your brain could be sleeping right now

Um... what? Sorry. Now I know there was something I was going to tell you... Got it.

White House bullies science blog over use of logo

Science blogger Keith Cowing though that using the Presidential Seal in an innocent blog post was no big deal. He was wrong.

'Speed-trap' radar used to detect concussion

Concussion can be notoriously difficult to detect - but a new radar-based method has been developed that can quickly screen individuals including athletes and soldiers on a battlefield.

DNA could act as an antenna in electromagnetic communications

A theoretical physicist has presented research that shows bacteria might transmit electromagnetic signals to produce species-specific wavelengths. 

Authorities 'were right to close airspace' after Icelandic volcano

Despite all the grumbling at the time, European aviation authorities were justified in grounding planes following the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano last year, new research shows.

Team makes breakthrough in development of artificial brain

Researchers have built a synthetic synapse in work that could one day lead to a fully-functioning artificial brain.

US team discovers heaviest antimatter yet

Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have made the heaviest antimatter ever found.   

Nanofiber spheres can carry cells into wounds to grow tissue

Scientists have made biodegradable polymers that can self-assemble into nanofiber spheres. They are injected into wounds to help cells form new tissue.

Study claims playing video games makes you eat more

According to a recent study by Canadian researchers, playing video games actually makes people eat more food, even if they aren’t hungry.

Scientists recommend technology diet

Could too much Facebook, Twitter, TV, and texting be bad for your health? As the amount of outside stimuli from technology increases, scientists are concerned our brains could be at risk.

How to travel the world on a unicycle

Most people fancy outdoor adventure - but that is often before they are subjected to some of the world’s most remote and harsh environments. 



Boy Scouts to introduce a robotics merit badge

When you think of the Boy Scouts you usually think of outdoors activities. But now scouts will have robotics as an activity.

Report: Insect-borne virus spread by sexual contact

History is replete with scientific findings whose discoveries were, in some respects, quite accidental.

World's business data nears ten zettabytes per year

We're a talkative species (some more so than others - ed.), but even so, it's something of a surprise to see just how much information's being exchanged every day on the internet - 9,570,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes per year, to be precise.

Computer controlled by thoughts alone

Washington University scientists have managed to connect people's  brains directly to a computer, allowing the computer to listen to their thoughts.

Tevatron data indicates unknown new particle

Physicists at Fermilab, which operates the Tevatron particle accelerator, say they may have found a new elementary particle - but not the so-called God particle, the elusive Higgs boson.

Lab-grown retina offers transplant hope

Japanese researchers have succeeded in persuading mouse stem cells to grow into a synthetic retina autonomously.

Branson plans trip to the depths of the oceans

It looks as if, for one man at least, space is far from the final frontier. Richard Branson has turned his attention to the seas, and is planning to take a mini submarine to the deepest point of each of the world's five oceans.