Could Large Hadron Collider be world's first time machine?

The Large Hadron Collider could - just possibly - be capable of causing matter to travel backwards in time.

Team claims it's found Atlantis

A - for once - reputable team of scientists believes it may have found the fabled lost city of Atlantis, saying it appears to have been destroyed by a tsunami.

Japan battles to prevent nuclear meltdown

Japanese officials are fighting to prevent a meltdown at its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Get back to your desk: workaholics live longer than laid-back people

Want to live for a long time? Cut out the jokes, worry a lot and work hard.

New switch could help build 'quantum internet'

A new switching device could represent a big step towards the creation of quantum networks, say researchers at Northwestern University.

Quantum engineers clear a roadblock in developing new technologies

An international team of scientists has overcome an obstacle that traditionally interfered with the engineering of quantum systems.

Reversing Doppler Effect holds promise for invisibility cloak

If scientists carry on at this rate, we'll soon have more types of invisibility cloak to choose from than Imelda Marcos had shoes.

Many 'dormant' volcanoes could erupt at any time

There may be no such thing as a dormant volcano, according to scientists, who say that many could in fact be reawakened in a period of months.

Earth's sixth mass extinction could already be underway

Life on earth is on the verge of a mass extinction comparable to that which wiped out the dinosaurs, scientists at UC Berkeley have warned.

Silver-Diamond mix offers cool capabilities for electronics

Georgia Tech Research Institute researchers are working on a new material to help cool the microelectronics in defense systems.

Team creates most powerful optical microscope ever

University of Manchester scientists say they've produced the world’s most powerful optical microscope, and that it could revolutionize the study of viruses and other diseases.

Scientist extracts DNA from Amelia Earhart's letters

In the age of CSI and Law & Order, scientists are putting newfound interest into the mystery of Amelia Earhart. Hoping to extract her DNA from dried saliva on two envelopes she is believed to have sealed, one British Columbia researcher is attempting to reveal new secrets about her past.

Facebook makes people pleased with themselves

Many things that are bad for you in large quantities can be good in moderation.

New materials have steel's strength and plastic's moldability

Yale University scientists say they've come up with a set of new metals that are stronger than steel but as easy to mold as plastic.

Mud volcano to continue erupting for 26 years

The world's largest mud volcano looks set to continue erupting for another 26 years. Lusi, in Indonesia, first blew in 2006, killing about 15 people and rendering thousands of families homeless. More than a dozen villages have been swallowed up.

Team shows newborn heart muscle can grow back by itself

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have discovered that the mammalian newborn heart can grow back when damaged, just as a lizard can grow a new tail.

New wine app powers the meal pairings of the future

In the future you will always have the perfect meal with the right wine to go along with it. The power of Semantic Web technology will make this easier for sommeliers than ever before.

WindTamer clean energy system goes hybrid

A lot of manufacturing plants go solar. Not too many, but some, use wind. But rarely if ever do we see something like what just went in at the Advanced Glass Industries (AGI) plant in Rochester, N.Y.: A combination of wind, solar and considerable storage capacity.


Smartphone app could help diagnose cancer

Doctors currently diagnosis suspicious lumps by using a needle to extract a sample for analysis. The sample - which is stained to highlight specific proteins - typically yields results in a few days, and may be inconclusive at times. 

Stretchable solar cells power artificial 'super skin'

Stanford researcher Zhenan Bao has created 'super skin' - so sensitive to pressure it can feel a fly touch down, and powered by flexible, stretchable solar cells.