A nice day to start a war?

The El Niño global climate cycle is triggering regular conflicts across the globe, new research suggests.

Report - exercise can help alleviate depression

Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center have concluded that moderate and intensive exercise may be just as useful as prescribing a second drug for depressed patients.

Nine-tenths of species still undiscovered

There are 8.7 million species on Earth, according to the latest estimate, claimed to be far more precise than any before.  

Claim: Biology texts may need to be revised

Basic biology textbooks may require some major revisions soon. That’s because biologists at UC San Diego have discovered some new information about our basic genetic material.  

Engineers embroider antennas onto clothes

Ohio State University engineers are getting pretty handy with a sewing machine, working on ways to incorporate radio antennas directly into clothing using plastic film and metallic thread.

Claim: Happiness can discourage teen crime

People have always wondered what society can do to discourage criminal activity. Well, it turns out that all you have to do to fight crime is spread happiness.

World's oldest fossils discovered

Scientists say they've found the world's oldest fossils, the remains of tiny creatures that lived 3.4 billion years ago in a pre-oxygen world.

Report: moderate drinking can help prevent dementia

A new analysis conducted by the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine claims that moderate social drinking can help reduce the risk of dementia and cognitive impairment.

'Bullet-proof' skin created

A Dutch artist says she's succeeded in creating a substance based on human skin which can stop a bullet in its tracks.

Haptic system helps keyhole surgeons

University of Leeds engineering students have found a way to let surgeons keep their sense of touch when carrying out keyhole surgery.

New robot designed to rescue trapped miners

A new robot designed to search out trapped miners in the event of an accident can navigate through 18 inches of water, crawl over boulders and rubble piles, and move in ahead of rescuers to evaluate dangerous environments.

Aerobic life existed 300 million years earlier than thought

Oxygen may have been sustaining life in Earth's oceans long before there was any trace of it in the atmosphere.

Radioactive sulfur in California 'not a problem' say scientists

Tiny amounts of radioactive sulfur reached California after the Fukushima nuclear disaster - but it's nothing to worry about, say scientists.

A lot of TV is as lethal as smoking

An average of six hours a day in front of the box could shorten life expectancy by almost five years - about the same as other well-known risk factors such as smoking.

Chinese neutrino experiment up and running

Two new detectors in China have started recording the interaction of antineutrinos in an experiment that could help explain why matter predominates over antimatter in the universe.

Tropical forest growth could increase carbon levels



Scientists from the University of Cambridge have concluded that enhanced tree growth in tropical forests could stimulate micro-organisms and lead to a release of stored soil carbon.

'Date rape' sensor identifies spiked drinks

Tel Aviv University researchers have developed an anti-date rape device that can detect whether a drink's been spiked and warn the victim.

New drug could cure all viral infections

Researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Lab say they've designed a drug that could potentially cure the common cold, flu and even Ebola as well as other viral diseases.

Team develops 'skin-like' brain-machine interface

A thin, wearable brain-machine interface could allow patients to be monitored outside of hospital, or let soldiers communicate silently in the field.

This stick-on tattoo is an electronic sensor

An international team of scientists has designed an ultra-thin, self-adhesive electronics device capable of measuring data about the heart, brain waves and muscle activity.