Graphene: the sexy, thin supermodel queen of the material world

It's really, really thin. It's tough as lead boots. It's sexy. It's graphene. And, the science world gets all hot and heavy when it is around. Brainiacs just love the super-material.  

Electricity from waste heat with more efficient materials

He found that by adding organic layers between layers of zinc it is possible to improve the performance of thermoelectric materials. The organic layers are also believed to have a major effect in reducing thermal conductivity, which would be very useful in thermoelectric materials.

Creating a nonlinear light-generating zero-index metamaterial

The Information Age will get a major upgrade with the arrival of quantum processors many times faster and more powerful than today’s supercomputers. For the benefits of this new Information Age 2.0 to be fully realized, however, quantum computers will need fast and efficient multi-directional light sources.

Report: Earth's gravity scarred by earthquakes

ESA’s GOCE satellite has revealed that the devastating Japanese earthquake of 2011 left its mark in Earth’s gravity – yet another example of this extraordinary mission surpassing its original scope.

10 times more throughput on optic fibers

Optical fibers carry data in the form of pulses of light over distances of thousands of miles at amazing speeds. They are one of the glories of modern telecommunications technology.

Report: Ocean crust could store many centuries of industrial CO2

Researchers from the University of Southampton have identified regions beneath the oceans where the igneous rocks of the upper ocean crust could safely store very large volumes of carbon dioxide.

New thermoelectronic generator

Through a process known as thermionic conversion, heat energy -- such as light from the sun or heat from burned fossil fuels -- can be converted into electricity with very high efficiency.

How bacteria respond so quickly to external changes

Understanding how bacteria adapt so quickly to changes in their external environment with continued high growth rates is one of the major research challenges in molecular microbiology. This is important not least for our understanding of resistance to antibiotics. A research study from Uppsala University is now presenting a model of how bacteria can rapidly adapt to environmental changes through smart regulation of their gene expression.

Tracking fracking pollution

As a result of the fracking revolution, North America has overtaken Saudi Arabia as the world's largest producer of oil and gas. This, despite endless protests from environmentalists. But does drilling for natural gas really cause pollution levels to skyrocket?

New algorithm finds you, even in untagged photos

A new algorithm designed at the University of Toronto has the power to profoundly change the way we find photos among the billions on social media sites such as Facebook and Flickr. This month, the United States Patent and Trademark Office will issue a patent on this technology.

Revising Darwin's thinking on invasive species

For more than a century and a half, researchers interested in invasive species have looked to Charles Darwin and what has come to be called his "naturalization conundrum."

Nanorobots for human drug delivery

A nanorobot is a popular term for molecules with a unique property that enables them to be programmed to carry out a specific task. In collaboration with colleagues in Italy and the USA, researchers at Aarhus University have now taken a major step towards building the first nanorobot of DNA molecules that can encapsulate and release active biomolecules.

Researchers shed new light on solar water-splitting process

With the help of a new method called "dual-electrode photoelectrochemistry," University of Oregon scientists have provided new insight into how solar water-splitting cells work. An important and overlooked parameter, they report, is the ion-permeability of electrocatalysts used in water-splitting devices.

A living desert underground

Hidden underneath the hilly grasslands studded with ocotillos and mesquite trees in southeastern Arizona lies a world shrouded in perpetual darkness: Kartchner Caverns, a limestone cave system renowned for its untouched cave formations, sculpted over millennia by groundwater dissolving the bedrock and carving out underground rooms, and passages that attract tourists from all over the world.

The lingering clouds

– A new study reveals how pollution causes thunderstorms to leave behind larger, deeper, longer lasting clouds. Appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences November 26, the results solve a long-standing debate and reveal how pollution plays into climate warming. The work can also provide a gauge for the accuracy of weather and climate models.

Report: Glaciers sizzle as they disappear into warmer water

Scientists have recorded and identified one of the most prominent sounds of a warming planet: the sizzle of glacier ice as it melts into the sea. The noise, caused by trapped air bubbles squirting out of the disappearing ice, could provide clues to the rate of glacier melt and help researchers better monitor the fast-changing polar environments.

Breakthrough discovery blocks AIDS virus replicating

Spanish researchers, including scientists from the University of Valencia, have developed small synthetic molecules capable of joining to the genetic material of the AIDS virus and blocking its replication.

Humans are porcine ape hybrids?

A top genetics expert claims that he has found evidence that modern humans were caused by pigs and chimps mating.

Violent games make you cheat and eat chocolate

An international team of researchers has found playing violent video games not only increases aggression but can also cause players to cheat and eat more chocolate.

Google founder's estranged wife up against the FDA

The outfit which brought the psychological genius Wilhelm Reich to an early grave, is now gunning for Anne Wojcicki, Sergey Brin's cuckquean.