El Nino tied to melting of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier

Pine Island Glacier is one of the biggest routes for ice to flow from Antarctica into the sea. The floating ice shelf at the glacier's tip has been melting and thinning for the past four decades, causing the glacier to speed up and discharge more ice.

Researchers discover molecule that protects the brain from cannabis intoxication

Two INSERM research teams led by Pier Vincenzo Piazza and Giovanni Marsicano (INSERM Unit 862 "Neurocentre Magendie" in Bordeaux) recently discovered that pregnenolone, a molecule produced by the brain, acts as a natural defence mechanism against the harmful effects of cannabis in animals.

How are human emotions mapped in the body?

Researchers at Aalto University have determined how emotions are experienced in the body.

Report: Global temperatures to rise at least 4°C by 2100

Global average temperatures will rise at least 4°C by 2100 and potentially more than 8°C by 2200 if carbon dioxide emissions are not reduced according to new research published in Nature. Scientists found global climate is more sensitive to carbon dioxide than most previous estimates.

Water, water everywhere: But is there enough to drink?

The challenge of supplying clean, safe drinking water to an expanding world population comes down to money, MIT economist Franklin Fisher says: We are surrounded by water — it covers 71 percent of Earth’s surface — and industrial-scale desalination has operated successfully around the world for many years.

Major reductions in seafloor marine life from climate change expected by 2100

A new study quantifies for the first time future losses in deep-sea marine life, using advanced climate models. Results show that even the most remote deep-sea ecosystems are not safe from the impacts of climate change.

Computing a football season

Randy Olson loves to see a program evolve.

Earth's crust was unstable in the Archean eon and dripped down into the mantle

Earth's crust was unstable in the Archean eon and dripped down into the mantle Model calculations indicate that the extreme density of the base of the thickened primary crust caused it to subside into Earth's mantle.

Report: Most clinical studies on vitamins flawed by poor methodology

Most large, clinical trials of vitamin supplements, including some that have concluded they are of no value or even harmful, have a flawed methodology that renders them largely useless in determining the real value of these micronutrients, a new analysis suggests.

'Approximate computing' improves efficiency, saves energy

Researchers are developing computers capable of "approximate computing" to perform calculations good enough for certain tasks that don't require perfect accuracy, potentially doubling efficiency and reducing energy consumption.

"Social" bacteria that work together to hunt for food and survive under harsh conditions

When considering the behavior of bacteria, the word "social" doesn't often come to mind. Yet some bacteria are quite social, chief among them Myxococcus xanthus, a soil-dwelling bacterium that organizes itself into multi-cellular, three-dimensional structures made up of thousands of cells that work together to hunt for food and survive under harsh conditions.

What sharks, honeybees and humans have in common

A mathematical pattern of movement called a Lévy walk describes the foraging behavior of animals from sharks to honey bees, and now for the first time has been shown to describe human hunter-gatherer movement as well. The study, led by University of Arizona anthropologist David Raichlen, was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Claim: Extensive use of antibiotics in agriculture creating public health crisis

Citing an overabundance in the use of antibiotics by the agriculture and aquaculture industries that poses a threat to public health, economics professor Aidan Hollis has proposed a solution in the form of user fees on the non-human use of antibiotics.

Mom and Dad are to blame for kid's online addictions

We all know how entitled millennials are supposed to be. Well, the next generation isn't looking so hot, either. They're stuck indoors, clasped to the bosoms of anxious parents. Is it any wonder they are addicts, addicted to interacting online.

Batteries as they are meant to be seen

Researchers have developed a way to microscopically view battery electrodes while they are bathed in wet electrolytes, mimicking realistic conditions inside actual batteries. While life sciences researchers regularly use transmission electron microscopy to study wet environments, this time scientists have applied it successfully to rechargeable battery research.

Researchers point to digital gains in human recognition

Human beings are highly efficient at recognising familiar faces, even from very poor quality images. New research led by a psychologist at the University of York is using advances in the level of detail available in digital photography to harness this human ability for use in forensics.

New approach to vertex connectivity could maximize networks' bandwidth

Computer scientists are constantly searching for ways to squeeze ever more bandwidth from communications networks.

Researchers create largest evolutionary 'timetree' of land plants to investigate traits that permit survival in cold climates

A team of researchers studying plants has assembled the largest dated evolutionary tree, using it to show the order in which flowering plants evolved specific strategies, such as the seasonal shedding of leaves, to move into areas with cold winters.

Claim: Solar activity not a key cause of climate change

Climate change has not been strongly influenced by variations in heat from the sun, a new scientific study shows. The findings overturn a widely held scientific view that lengthy periods of warm and cold weather in the past might have been caused by periodic fluctuations in solar activity.

Report: Some plants may not adapt quickly to future climate change

Using the largest dated evolutionary tree of flowering plants ever assembled, a new study suggests how plants developed traits to withstand low temperatures, with implications that human-induced climate change may pose a bigger threat than initially thought to plants and global agriculture.