Neanderthal lineages excavated from modern human genomes

A substantial fraction of the Neanderthal genome persists in modern human populations. A new approach applied to analyzing whole-genome sequencing data from 665 people from Europe and East Asia shows that more than 20 percent of the Neanderthal genome survives in the DNA of this contemporary group, whose genetic information is part of the 1,000 Genomes Project.

Is this the world's hottest computational biologist?

This year's winner of the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science is Pardis Sabeti, M.D., Ph.D. You know... really smart... Oxford... Harvard... you are a dumb-ass compared to her etc. etc. Her work is helping scientists identify how to defeat diseases and microbes. Oh, yeah, she also happens to be in a rock band.

Microwires as mobile phone sensors

Microwires were created in the former Soviet Union for military purposes. They formed the basis of the camouflage of a model of spy plane used by the Soviet army, but for a long time the scientific community has been studying them for other purposes.

Scientists find genetic mechanism linking aging to specific diets

Your best friend swears by the Paleo Diet. Your boss loves Atkins. Your sister is gluten-free, and your roommate is an acolyte of Michael Pollan. So who's right? Maybe they all are.

River of hydrogen flowing through space seen with Green Bank Telescope

River of Hydrogen Flowing through Space Seen with Green Bank Telescope Using the National Science Foundation’s Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer D.J. Pisano from West Virginia University has discovered what could be a never-before-seen river of hydrogen flowing through space.

Asian ozone pollution in Hawaii tied to climate variability

Air pollution from Asia has been rising for several decades but Hawaii had seemed to escape the ozone pollution that drifts east with the springtime winds. Now a team of researchers has found that shifts in atmospheric circulation explain the trends in Hawaiian ozone pollution.

Understanding rise, fall and re-emergence of plague strains

One branch of a deadly pathogen’s family tree may have ended centuries ago, but from its ancient traces researchers can read a lineage with links to the modern world.

Environmentally friendly, energy-dense sugar battery developed to power the world's gadgets

A Virginia Tech research team has developed a battery that runs on sugar and has an unmatched energy density, a development that could replace conventional batteries with ones that are cheaper, refillable, and biodegradable.

New quantum dots herald a new era of electronics operating on a single-atom level

New types of solotronic structures, including the world's first quantum dots containing single cobalt ions, have been created and studied at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw. The materials and elements used to form these structures allow us forecast new trends in solotronics – a field of experimental electronics and spintronics of the future, based on operations occurring on a single-atom level.

New boron nanomaterial may be possible

Researchers from Brown University have shown experimentally that a boron-based competitor to graphene is a very real possibility. Graphene has been heralded as a wonder material. Made of a single layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb arrangement, graphene is stronger pound-for-pound than steel and conducts electricity better than copper.

Is there an ocean beneath our feet?

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from the Earth’s oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought.

Why life got big in the Earth's early oceans

Why did life forms first begin to get larger and what advantage did this increase in size provide? UCLA biologists working with an international team of scientists examined the earliest communities of large multicellular organisms in the fossil record to help answer this question.

Report: North and tropical Atlantic warming affects Antarctic climate

The gradual warming of the North and tropical Atlantic Ocean is contributing to climate change in Antarctica, a team of New York University (NYU) scientists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has concluded. Their findings appear in the Jan. 23 edition of the journal Nature.

Ancient European hunter-gatherers were dark skinned and blue-eyed

  Suck it, white supremacists! The genome of a 7,000-year-old individual from the Mesolithic site of La Brana-Arintero (Leon, Spain) has been recovered and it has African versions in the genes that determine pigmentatio of the skin. 

World's smartest dude regrets biggest blunder

Stephen Hawking, the 70 year old greatest living physicist of the universe, has identified his biggest mistake. Only Hawking can get away with saying that, strictly speaking, there are no black holes in our universe.

Changing climate: How dust changed the face of the earth

Bremerhaven/Germany, 24 January 2014. In spring 2010, the research icebreaker Polarstern returned from the South Pacific with a scientific treasure - ocean sediments from a previously almost unexplored part of the South Polar Sea.

Report: Arctic inland waters emit large amounts of carbon

Geoscientist Erik Lundin shows in his thesis that streams and lakes of Northern Sweden are hotspots for emissions of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere.

Cooling microprocessors with carbon nanotubes

“Cool it!” That’s a prime directive for microprocessor chips and a promising new solution to meeting this imperative is in the offing. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a “process friendly” technique that would enable the cooling of microprocessor chips through carbon nanotubes.

JILA strontium atomic clock sets new records in both precision and stability

Heralding a new age of terrific timekeeping, a research group led by a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physicist has unveiled an experimental strontium atomic clock that has set new world records for both precision and stability-- key metrics for the performance of a clock.

Air pollution tied to China exports

Chinese air pollution blowing across the Pacific Ocean is often caused by the manufacturing of goods for export to the U.S. and Europe, according to findings by UC Irvine and other researchers published earlier this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.