The Anatomy of an Asteroid

ESO’s New Technology Telescope (NTT) has been used to find the first evidence that asteroids can have a highly varied internal structure. By making exquisitely precise measurements astronomers have found that different parts of the asteroid Itokawa have different densities.

Graphene ‘sandwich’ improves imaging of biomolecules

By sandwiching a biological molecule between sheets of graphene, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have obtained atomic-level images of the molecule in its natural watery environment.

Why was ancient Earth was so hot?

The release of volatile organic compounds from Earth’s forests and smoke from wildfires 3 million years ago had a far greater impact on global warming than ancient atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide, a new Yale study finds.

With 166 million mobile business customers, Samsung hopes to rock the enterprise boat

​ABI Research estimates that at the end of 2013 Samsung had 166 million mobile business customers defined as employed individuals using their smartphone for business and personal reasons. However, most of these customers are the more fickle BYOD users.

Off-the-shelf materials lead to self-healing polymers

Look out, super glue and paint thinner. Thanks to new dynamic materials developed at the University of Illinois, removable paint and self-healing plastics soon could be household products.

Researchers develop 'envy-free' algorithm for settling disputes

Whether it's season tickets to Green Bay Packers' games or silver place settings, divorce and inheritance have bred protracted disputes over the assignment of belongings. But, now, a trio of researchers has found a method for resolving such conflicts in an envy-free way.

Arctic lakes show climate on thin ice

Ice in northern Alaska’s lakes during winter months is on the decline. Twenty years of satellite radar imagery show how changes in our climate are affecting high-latitude environments. Changes in air temperature and winter precipitation over the last five decades have affected the timing, duration and thickness of the ice cover on lakes in the Arctic.

Climate change threatens to cause trillions in damage to world's coastal regions

New research predicts that coastal regions may face massive increases in damages from storm surge flooding over the course of the 21st century. According to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, global average storm surge damages could increase from about $10-$40 billion per year today to up to $100,000 billion per year by the end of century, if no adaptation action is taken.

Storage system for ‘big data’ dramatically speeds access to information

As computers enter ever more areas of our daily lives, the amount of data they produce has grown enormously. But for this “big data” to be useful it must first be analyzed, meaning it needs to be stored in such a way that it can be accessed quickly when required.

Claim: Nature selectively buffers human-caused global warming

Can naturally occurring processes selectively buffer the full brunt of global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions resulting from human activities? Yes, find researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Johns Hopkins University in the US and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

3-D scanning with your smartphone

Traditionally, 3-D scanning has required expensive laser scanner equipment, complicated software, and technological expertise.

Standing on a comet

A comet-bound spacecraft that spent more than two years in a deep sleep mode woke up on Jan. 20 to begin the home stretch of its decade-long journey to a mile-wide ball of rock, dust and ice. Rosetta—a European Space Agency-led mission that involves University of Michigan engineers and scientists—is on track to be the first craft to actually land on a comet as well as track it for an extended period of time.

Quantum dots provide complete control of photons

By emitting photons from a quantum dot at the top of a micropyramid, researchers at Linköping University are creating a polarized light source for such things as energy-saving computer screens and wiretap-proof communications.

Nearly everyone uses Piezoelectrics -- but how do they work?

iezoelectrics—materials that can change mechanical stress to electricity and back again—are everywhere in modern life. Computer hard drives. Loud speakers. Medical ultrasound. Sonar.

Integration brings quantum computer a step closer

An international research group led by the University of Bristol has made an important advance towards a quantum computer by shrinking down key components and integrating them onto a silicon microchip.

Sodium ion battery tech gets new twist with flexible molybdenum disulfide electrodes

A Kansas State University engineer has made a breakthrough in rechargeable battery applications.

This electronic tongue drinks beer

Spanish researchers have managed to distinguish between different varieties of beer using an electronic tongue. The discovery, published in the journal 'Food Chemistry', is accurate in almost 82% of cases.

Obama admin wants more green buses on the road

The continued expansion of zero-emissions buses across the United States got a boost from the federal government earlier this month when the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announced close to $25 million in funding towards the effort.

Researchers take magnetic waves for a spin

Researchers at New York University have developed a method for creating and directing fast moving waves in magnetic fields that have the potential to enhance communication and information processing in computer chips and other consumer products.

New theory may lead to more efficient solar cells

A new theoretical model developed by professors at the University of Houston (UH) and Université de Montréal may hold the key to methods for developing better materials for solar cells.