Lone inventor creates stronger steel

A Detroit inventor has found a way to make steel seven percent stronger than any steel on record, offering the promise of lighter, thinner car bodies and stronger armored vehicles.

Periodic table gains two new elements

Two new elements have been officially added to the periodic table - twelve years after they were first discovered.

Alternative to antibiotics discovered

With bacteria increasingly developing resistance to antibiotics, German researchers say they've found a replacement.

GPS used to detect illegal nuclear tests

At this week's Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) meeting, American researchers will unveil a new tool for detecting illegal nuclear explosions: the Earth’s global positioning system (GPS).

How to probe quantum weirdness in a nano-nut-shell

An international team of researchers has developed an artificial semiconductor structure capable of superimposing a pattern created by advanced fabrication methods that are precise at the nanometer scale.

Smart bandage warns of infection

Australian scientists have developed a 'smart bandage' that changes color when a wound becomes infected.

Team dramatically improves US flood and drought prediction

A Columbia Engineering School team says it's made a major step in improving forecasts of extreme weather events in the US.

Male contraceptive pill under development

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center believe they're close to developing a male contraceptive pill with none of the side effects of previous, steroid-based versions.

Antimatter trapped for 1,000 seconds

CERN scientists have succeeding in trapping antimatter for a record 16 and a half minutes -  long enough to begin studying it in detail.

Video: Project GreenVax targets potential biothreats

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has released a video documenting the progress of Project GreenVax.

Big leap forward for DNA computing

Caltech researchers have built the most complex biochemical circuit ever, creating a DNA computer that can calculate square roots.

Report: Iraqi War vets suffer from high rate of respiratory illness

Army veteran Scott Weakley is a former marathon runner who returned from the second Iraq war barely able to climb two or three flights of stairs without feeling exhausted. 

Team stamps out nanodevices with a vise

A team from Vanderbilt University says it's found a quick and easy way of producing low cost nanodevices.

DARPA wants you to design its next UAV

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has had a great idea about how to develop the next generation of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) - it wants you to do it.

Intern discovers universe's missing mass

A short-term intern at Australia's Monash University appears to have cracked a problem that's been baffling astrophysicists for decades - the so-called missing mass problem.

A net zero retrofit powered by algae?

Metropolis magazine recently issued a challenged to young designers: help the U.S. General Services Administration cut carbon emissions by retrofitting a 46-year-old federal building in downtown Los Angeles. 



Satellite images reveal 17 lost Egyptian pyramids

An archaeologist at the University of Alabama in Birmingham says she's discovered 17 lost pyramids in Egypt - without even leaving her desk.

Nuclear radiation affects gender of babies

New research challenges the belief that exposure to nuclear radiation has a negligible genetic effect on human beings, indicating that it can lead to an increase in male births.

Blind people can echolocate using visual center of brain

Canadian researchers have discovered just how some blind people are able to navigate accurately using the same echolocation technique as bats and dolphins.

Team convinces subjects they're Barbie-doll sized

Scientists at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet have been messing with people's heads, convincing them that they're just a foot tall.