Gamers solve AIDS puzzle where scientists fail

Online gamers have succeeded where scientists have failed for a decade, successfully deciphering the structure of an AIDS-like retrovirus enzyme.

Carbon nanoparticles can damage kidney cells

Even at low concentrations, carbon nanoparticles in the environment could damage human health, say medical researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Colored dinosaur feathers found trapped in amber

A University of Alberta research team has discovered a remarkable collection of Cretaceous feathers trapped in tree resin.

Mammoth blood proteins could be used in major surgery

The blood from woolly mammoths is helping scientists develop new blood products for medical procedures such as heart and brain surgery.

Synthetic yeast allows on-demand evolution

A team of Johns Hopkins researchers has created from scratch a new form of yeast that includes synthetic DNA.

Artificial blood vessels made through 3D printing

German scientists say they're building a 3D printer that can print out artificial blood vessels.

Science under threat from pressure for positive results

Scientific research could be set for a big decline because of a growing tendency to report only positive findings.

New materials could help find hidden nuclear weapons

Northwestern University scientists say they've taken a big step towards a handheld device for detecting nuclear weapons and materials such as a 'bomb in a suitcase'.

Fetuses can't tell touch from pain until shortly before birth

In a study that could have important implications for the abortion debate, neuroscientists say they've established that fetuses can't distinguish pain from touch until 35-37 weeks gestation – just before they'd normally be born.

Well-preserved fossils could be earliest human ancestor

Researchers say they've discovered a 'missing link' - a hominid 1.8 million years old that may be our oldest direct human ancestor yet found.

Microbes turn nuclear waste into electricity

Researchers at Michigan State University have developed a new strain of a microbe which can efficiently clean up nuclear waste and other toxic metals while generating electricity.

Tank disguised by infra-red cloak

BAE Systems has tested an invisibility cloak that allows a vehicle to blend into its surroundings in the infra-red and other frequencies.

World’s largest fusion experiment restarts after upgrade

Last Friday, the JET fusion power project went back into operation after the installation of the 'ITER-Like Wall'.

Ancient humans interbred with other species

Our ancient human ancestors interbred with other early hominids as well as Neanderthals, new research indicates.       

This electric motor is made from a molecule



Scientist at Tufts University have developed a single molecule electric motor that measures a mere 1 nanometer across.

Team produces weird optical phenomena - and rewrites the rules of refraction

Researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have induced light rays to behave in a way that defies the laws of reflection and refraction, while producing some weird fun-house images on the way.

'Star-Trek' sick bay detects diseases

British engineers have built a £1 million Star Trek-style 'sick bay' for the National Health Service, debuting at the Leicester Royal Infirmary's accident and emergency department.

Antibiotic resistance is thousands of years old

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are nothing new - they've been around for at least 30,000 years, say scientists at McMaster University.

Low-cost microscope uses holograms, not lenses

Researchers at UCLA have built a compact, light-weight, dual-mode microscope that uses holograms instead of lenses, and which they say is ideal for use in developing countries.

Team drills to the heart of San Andreas Fault

An international team of scientists and engineers has drilled down a mile and a half into the epicenter of an earthquake.