Two merging tsunamis caused Japanese devastation

The tidal wave that hit Japan in March was formed by two separate tsunamis, in a phenomenon that had been theorized but never before observed.

Mammoth find raises hopes of successful cloning

A Japanese team which has been hoping to clone a mammoth says that a specimen discovered this summer looks likely to yield up the necessary DNA.

Starfish robot shimmies through tight spaces

Harvard University engineers have built a limbo-dancing robot that can squeeze under obstacles in its path for search and rescue missions.

Graphene used to sniff out explosives

It sometimes seems as if there isn't anything that can't be done better with graphene. Now, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute say that the stuff can outperform leading commercial gas sensors in detecting potentially dangerous and explosive chemicals.

CT scanning used to recreate Stradivarius violin

Using computed tomography (CT) imaging and advanced manufacturing techniques, a team of radiologists and violin makers has created a reproduction of a 1704 Stradivarius.

Beetles with backpacks could check out danger

University of Michigan engineers are kitting out beetles with sensors, aiming to use them to monitor hazardous situations before sending in human beings.

Team creates 'human-on-a-chip'

Researchers have for the first time used stem cells to grow neuromuscular junctions between human muscle cells and human spinal cord cells - the key connectors used by the brain to communicate and control muscles in the body.

Degrees of separation? Under five, and falling

When it comes to Facebook, it seems we're not all linked by six degrees of separation - the true figure is actually 4.74.

Unmanned subs begin record-breaking journey

Over the weekend, four robot vehicles set out to cross the Pacific, on the longest journey ever attempted by an unmanned ocean vehicle.

New experiment shows faster-than-light travel

An improved re-run of the experiment that appeared to show faster-than-light travel was possible has produced the same result.

World's lightest material created

A team of researchers from UC Irvine, HRL Laboratories and the California Institute of Technology have developed the world’s lightest material – about one hundred times lighter than Styrofoam.

And Chalmers University said 'let there be light'

Scientists at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in creating light from vacuum.

Mystery of 'ghost mountains' solved

Scientists have solved the mystery of how a mountain range as big as the Alps came to exist deep beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Online chat boosts lying, say researchers

People are more likely to lie when communicating electronically, and email generates more fibs than instant messaging.

Earth safe from supervolcanoes, for now

The term's used to describe explosive volcanic eruptions that eject about ten thousand times the quantity of magma and ash as Mount St Helens, one of the most explosive eruptions in recent years.

DARPA designs a FastRunner robot

DARPA researchers at MIT and the Florida Institute of Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) are designing a "FastRunner" robot that will be capable of moving at 10 times the speed of standard mobile 'bots.

Clever kids more likely to take drugs

Children with high IQs - and especially girls - are more likely to take illegal drugs in their 30s, new research shows.

Science could soon be as fun as video games

Children sitting in science classes across the nation may soon be able to take virtual trips through the layers of the Earth to see how shifting plates can cause earthquakes, volcanoes and make mountains.

NASA material is blacker than black

NASA engineers have produced the blackest stuff ever created - a material that absorbs more than 99 percent of the ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and far-infrared light that hits it.

World's smallest car is a billionth the size of yours

Dutch researchers say they've created the world's smallest electric vehicle - consisting of just a single molecule.