Was Einstein wrong? Speed of light appears to have been broken

European scientists believe they've observed subatomic particles traveling faster than the speed of light - something that Einstein's theory of relativity says should be impossible.

Brain imaging reveals the movies in our minds

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have managed to decode and reconstruct dynamic visual experiences processed by the human brain.

'Longevity gene' is nothing of the sort

British scientists have poured cold water on US research that claimed to have identified a gene responsible for ageing.

Twin Towers brought down by molten aluminum, says scientist

An international materials technology conference in San Diego has been given a new explanation for the explosions heard within the Twin Towers just before their collapse.

Seismologists in court over Italian earthquake

Six Italian scientists and former government officials are to appear in court today over charges that their failure to predict an earthquake led to hundreds of deaths.

Intelligent T-shirts track vital signs

Scientists at la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid have developed an 'intelligent' T-shirt that monitors people's vital signs and tracks their position.

Team creates 'living' cells made of metal

Scottish scientists say they've taken the first steps towards creating a form of life based on inorganic elements.

Gamers solve AIDS puzzle where scientists fail

Online gamers have succeeded where scientists have failed for a decade, successfully deciphering the structure of an AIDS-like retrovirus enzyme.

Carbon nanoparticles can damage kidney cells

Even at low concentrations, carbon nanoparticles in the environment could damage human health, say medical researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Colored dinosaur feathers found trapped in amber

A University of Alberta research team has discovered a remarkable collection of Cretaceous feathers trapped in tree resin.

Mammoth blood proteins could be used in major surgery

The blood from woolly mammoths is helping scientists develop new blood products for medical procedures such as heart and brain surgery.

Synthetic yeast allows on-demand evolution

A team of Johns Hopkins researchers has created from scratch a new form of yeast that includes synthetic DNA.

Artificial blood vessels made through 3D printing

German scientists say they're building a 3D printer that can print out artificial blood vessels.

Science under threat from pressure for positive results

Scientific research could be set for a big decline because of a growing tendency to report only positive findings.

New materials could help find hidden nuclear weapons

Northwestern University scientists say they've taken a big step towards a handheld device for detecting nuclear weapons and materials such as a 'bomb in a suitcase'.

Fetuses can't tell touch from pain until shortly before birth

In a study that could have important implications for the abortion debate, neuroscientists say they've established that fetuses can't distinguish pain from touch until 35-37 weeks gestation – just before they'd normally be born.

Well-preserved fossils could be earliest human ancestor

Researchers say they've discovered a 'missing link' - a hominid 1.8 million years old that may be our oldest direct human ancestor yet found.

Microbes turn nuclear waste into electricity

Researchers at Michigan State University have developed a new strain of a microbe which can efficiently clean up nuclear waste and other toxic metals while generating electricity.

Tank disguised by infra-red cloak

BAE Systems has tested an invisibility cloak that allows a vehicle to blend into its surroundings in the infra-red and other frequencies.

World’s largest fusion experiment restarts after upgrade

Last Friday, the JET fusion power project went back into operation after the installation of the 'ITER-Like Wall'.