Too many consumers leaving banking details on multiple mobile devices



Almost half of consumers are risking leaking confidential personal data and valuable banking details to hackers by remaining logged in across multiple mobile devices.

Related: Facebook’s app-to-app linking already under fire

New research carried out by Intercede showed that a whopping 76 per cent remain logged on to social media accounts on multiple mobile devices and 45 per cent admitted the same is true for mobile banking accounts.

“Keeping your Facebook, Gmail, shopping and financial accounts automatically logged in might be convenient for consumers, but it’s leaving the back door wide open to hackers.  Consumers are more wary about clicking ‘Remember me’ when it comes to online banking and financial apps, but cyber criminals don’t necessarily need access to your bank account or credit card details to commit identity theft,” said Richard Parris, CEO of Intercede.

The survey, which covered 2,000 consumers, is part of a report entitled “The Rise of the Identity Centric Economy” and it also found that 54 per cent stay logged in to PayPal on multiple devices and 46 per cent stay logged in to Amazon and other shopping sites.

Automatic log-in is another problem and 37 per cent admitted to selecting the option for Amazon and other online shopping sites, 23 per cent for mobile banking and 27 per cent for PayPal.

Related: Amazon's smartphone: cornering the Internet for shopping

Setting a PIN code on a mobile device is done by 53 per cent of people, however, of all those surveyed, 28 per cent admitted knowing a PIN code for a friend, family member or colleague’s mobile device.

The passwords themselves are also often unsecure as three in five admitted to using memory as the only method to being able to recall a passwords thus suggesting customers are utilising memorable combinations or the same password across multiple sites.




More

Debate: Should body surveillance cameras expand beyond police work?

The idea of surveillance is a double edged sword, especially in the post-Snowden era. Increased surveillance can help ensure quality and safety in a number of different industries, but is the impact to privacy worth it? 1World Member Joseph Rathjen proposed this provocative question and the call was answered by Augie Grant, a research professional and professor at the University of South Carolina. Watch the debate unfold below, and vote for the topic and the expert opinions below. Make sure to check back over the next two weeks for additional rounds to the debate!

Why do people have so many phones?

There are dozens of articles talking about iPhones these days and at the end of each article there are a slew of comments from all sorts of people who apparently own multiple phones.

The iPhone feature people may never use – making phone calls with it

Everybody is talking about Apple selling 10 million new iPhones in the first week – well they aren’t actually talking about it, they're texting about it. Does anyone make actual phone calls with phones anymore?