Are you a nomophobe?



Nomophobe: the fear of being without a cellphone – many of us have it, we just don’t want to admit it.

According to the Mobile Mindset Study conducted by security app Lookout, 58 percent of U.S. smartphone owners check their phones at least every hour -- and a large share check their phones while in bed or in the bathroom.

If in some catastrophic event they were to lose their device, 73 percent of people admit they would feel "panicked" while another 14 percent would feel "desperate."

But despite all the research showing that we need to take a step back from our devices in order to be happier and healthier, we still cling to them like lifeboats.

Related: Your Smartphone Is About To Get A New Superpower

I ran across an interesting infographic created by WhoIsHostingThis? that highlights some of the many datapoints about phones and our health.

Related: The Undead PC: The Most Impressive Thing Apple Launched Was A PC

WhoIsHostingThis? has an assortment of interesting, sometimes humorous infographics and we’ll share them with you occasionally (or you could just go to their site and read them all).



Guy Wright

Guy Wright has been covering the technology space since the days when computers had cranks and networks were steam powered. He has been a writer and editor for more years then he cares to admit. He has lost count of the number of articles, blogs, reviews, rants and books that he has published over the years, but he hasn’t stopped learning and writing about new things.


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