Samsung Galaxy S5 LTE-A out in South Korea



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Samsung has unveiled a new variant of the Galaxy S5 over in South Korea, with a snappier CPU and higher resolution screen.

The Samsung Galaxy S5 LTE-A, as the name suggests, also supports LTE-Advanced for even faster mobile surfing speeds (or even faster burning through your mobile data allowance, depending on whether your glass is half full or empty).

According to Droid Life, the handset boasts a 2,560 x 1,440 Super AMOLED screen, a 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 805 (with an Adreno 420 GPU), backed by 3GB of RAM (and it'll need that muscle to shift all those pixels).

Other than those changes, it's much the same story as the original Galaxy S5, including a 16 megapixel rear-facing camera, 2 megapixel front-facer, and a 2,800mAh battery. Obviously, though, the changes that have been made are major ones – particularly the screen.

For the moment, this phone is for South Korea only, and it's not known if it will see wider deployment, or indeed if this model is the long-rumoured premium version of the Galaxy S5 (which speculation said would up the CPU and display as seen on this handset). It's possible that there'll be another model for international markets that will bear the Prime (or Galaxy F) moniker, but only time will tell.

Related: The Elements of A Winning Wearable Device

Image Credit: Droid Life




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