Leaked image of Apple iPhone 6 next to Galaxy S5 is an eye opener



This time around, there have been plenty of images leaked of the next iPhone alongside the usual spec details, and another pic has recently popped up online.

Related: Amazon’s Fire Phone 4 hits, a miss, and a wild card.

Previously, we've seen an image of the purported iPhone 6 next to HTC's flagship One M8, and the new photo shows Apple's alleged device next to Samsung's Galaxy S5. Feast your eyes on it above – the S5 is on the right.

The picture was published courtesy of GSM Arena, and it shows that the two phones are about as tall as each other, although the Galaxy S5 is considerably wider. The iPhone 6 has thicker bezels top and bottom, but it has thinner bezels down the side of the screen. The upshot is that despite growing in size to a 4.7in screen (from 4in), the iPhone should still be considerably more suited to one-handed use.

You can also see the rounded edges on the iPhone 6 which have previously been rumoured, a design feature that should allow for a more comfortable hold. Previous leakage has also indicated that the new iPhone will be very thin, and that would be no surprise; Apple always wants to produce something that wows in terms of design and svelteness.

Last week's round of rumours also speculated that the iPhone 6 will finally come with NFC and wireless charging on board, with an improved 4G antenna for faster mobile surfing.

Related: Samsung vs. Apple (vs. just about everyone) in smart home wars

We'll find out come September, and also whether Apple will follow this model up with a larger 5.5in phablet, which has been the thinking for quite some time now.

Image Credit: GSM Arena




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