ASUS tops Greenpeace eco-league

Posted by Emma Woollacott

ASUS is the greenest notebook manufacturer, according to Greenpeace, which has released a report on the most environmentally-friendly computers, monitors, phones and televisions.

The company's UL30A notebook scored 5.59 out of a possible ten, and its VW-247H-HF monitor was also the greenest with 7.5 points.

Other product category leaders include the Sharp LC-52SE1 television, the Sony Ericcson Aspen smartphone, the Samsung GT-S75550 mobile phone, the Acer TM8172 netbook and the HP Compaq 6005 Pro Ultra-slim desktop.

"As a technology leader in the new digital era, it is our responsibility to reduce our carbon footprint and monitor the entire life-cycle of our products," says ASUS chairman Jonney Shih. "It is just the beginning of Green ASUS. Consumers can anticipate even more innovative green products from us in the near future."

Once again, Apple refused to take part in the survey; but Greenpeace went ahead and assessed the the newly-released
Philips’ Econova TV and Apple’s Macbook Pro MC374 anyway. It couldn't do a proper job as it didn't have enough information, but concluded that the machine was entirely free of PVC and BFRs.

"Had Apple provided all the data that was required, its notebook would probably have been a real challenge to the Asus model," the report concludes.

The survey rated products based on their toxic chemical phase-out, energy efficiency, product lifespan and energy used in production, with additional points given for unique innovation.

"Our survey shows that electronics manufacturers have made demonstrable progress over the past few years by producing products that are free of the worst toxic chemicals, more energy efficient and more easily taken back for reuse or recycling," says Renee Blanchard, Greenpeace International toxics campaigner.

"Major brands are responding to consumer demand for greener gadgets, and we expect them to continue to innovate and make all their products, and not just a niche few, with these higher green standards."