Jackson's Hobbit goes FTW

Posted by David Konow

The Hobbit just had its world premiere on November 28 in New Zealand, and as we saw in the latest Peter Jackson production diary, it was quite a mad dash rush to complete th efilm, but he indeed made the finish line right on time.

Due to an embargo, there are no actual reviews yet, but that certainly doesn’t mean there isn’t any news surrounding the long-awaited film. 

First off, about a hundred thousand native New Zealanders came out for the premiere. The Prime Minister of New Zealand, John Key told the press, "New Zealand took a risk investing in The Hobbit, it’s paid off." James Cameron was also at the premiere, and he’s currently living in New Zealand working on the scripts for Avatar 2 and 3. Cameron bought a farm in Wairapa, which is actually a flyable distance from Jackson’s stomping grounds in Wellington. 
 
Despite the fact that there’s been an embargo on reviews, there have been tweets of course, including a tweet from Bryan Singer, the director of the first two X-Men films and the upcoming Jack the Giant Slayer. His verdict? "Loved it!," Singer wrote. "Having some serious frame rate envy."
 
That of course was a reference to the new higher frame rate for the film 48 frames a second, and The Hobbit will be the big test whether this new technology is going to fly or not. As Collider notes, Cameron, who’s planning to shoot the Avatar sequels at 48 frames a second, said at the premiere, "If there is acceptance of 48, that will pave the way for Avatar to take advantage of it. We charged out ahead on 3D with Avatar, now Peter’s doing it with The Hobbit. It takes that kind of bold move to make change."
 
Jackson's Hobbit goes FTWJackson also spoke to the L.A. Times about the growth of Gollum, both in terms of the character and related technology for The Hobbit. "Gollum is a much more sophisticated performer now than he was 10 years ago. Gollum certainly benefits from a much more intricate muscle system. Obviously with a CGI character, you’re building a character in much the same way as a real creature is built. You build the bones, the skeletons, the muscles."
 
And indeed, at the premiere of The Hobbit, Richard Armitage, who plays the leader of the dwarves, Thorin, told the Reporter, "The thing that inspires me is that [Peter’s] as fascinated with technology and where film can go as he is with story and character." There will certainly be more Hobbit news to come, stay tuned to TG for more as it comes in.