Alleged Kinect 2 details hit the ‘Net

Posted by Trent Nouveau

The man who famously leaked the first images of the Xbox 720 Durango dev kit has tipped up again with what appears to be a development program for Kinect 2. 



The image below - tweeted by SuperDaE and snapped by the CVG crew - appears to illustrate how the next-gen Kinect will be capable of tracking individual fingers, as well as the shape of clothes and their silhouettes. 



Interestingly, recently leaked Xbox 720 docs indicate that Redmond designed the latest iteration of Kinect with two separate camera sensors mounted on either side of the TV. 

This configuration serves to enhance the platform’s depth perception accuracy, allowing precise tracking of up to four players. 



Although official specs are scarce, the Xbox 720 is believed to feature Blu-ray compatibility, a pair of augmented reality glasses, ‘Kinect V2,’ a $299.99 price point and a tentative 2013 launch date.

As noted above, SuperDaE made waves in the gaming world this past July when he advertised an Xbox 720 dev kit for sale at a cool $10,000. The 64-bit kit purportedly boasts an x86 Intel CPU, an Nvidia GPU and 8GB of memory - rather than the 12 claimed by a number of other sources.

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DaE also says that Microsoft is targeting an eight-core CPU for the final retail hardware - if true, this must surely be based around Atom architecture to fit inside the thermal envelope," explained EuroGamer's Richard Leadbetter. 



"The hardware configuration seems difficult to believe as it is so divorced from the technological make-up of the current Xbox 360, and we could find no corroborative sources to establish the Intel/Nvidia hook-up, let alone the eight-core CPU."

Nevertheless, Leadbetter confirmed another source had corroborated the 64-bit nature of the 720 moments before GDC kicked off, clarifying that current DirectX 11 engines developed on the PC can be ported to 64-bit and run without issue on Microsoft's new console. 



"[Remember], the platform holder achieved immense success by basing the Xbox 360 workflow closely on existing PC development tools and the DirectX API and it looks as though it aims to continue that recipe for success with its next-gen [system].



"Of course, this anonymous-looking PC box is not the machine Microsoft will be selling at retail next year - it's alpha kit, assembled from existing parts to best emulate the hardware configuration of the console and actual silicon will be in the closing phases of development as we speak," he added.