New bill aims to eliminate TSA scanning, groping

Posted by David Gomez

Americans are getting fed up with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) molesting and x-raying travelers.

Congressman Ron Paul lashed out at the TSA yesterday and introduced a bill aimed at stopping federal abuse of passengers.

Paul’s proposed legislation would pave the way for TSA employees to be sued for feeling up Americans and putting them through unsafe naked body scanners. He wants to prevent travelers "from being treated like cattle."

 
During his speech on the House floor yesterday on CSPAN, Paul said that the way Americans are being treated at airports proves that America as a whole needs to gather up courage and tell the federal government that, “enough is enough”.
    
"Imagine if the political elites in our country were forced to endure the same conditions at the airport as business travelers, families, senior citizens, and the rest of us," the Congressman said in his defiant speech.

"Perhaps this problem could be quickly resolved if every cabinet secretary, every member of Congress, and every department head in the Obama administration were forced to submit to the same degrading screening process as the people who pay their salaries."

Paul was very upset as he let the TSA have it with both barrels.

“If this doesn’t change, I see what has happened to the American people is we have accepted the notion that we should be treated like cattle. Make us safe, make us secure, put us in the barbed wire, feed us, fatten us up, and then they’ll eat us. And we are a bunch of cattle and we have to wake up and say we’ve had it…. It’s time for the American people to stand up and shrug off the shackles of our government at TSA at the airport,” he said.
    
H.R. 6416 - The American Traveler Dignity Act, is straight to the point. For the first time in a long time we have an important bill that is so small, one can read it in a matter of seconds:
    
A BILL

To ensure that certain Federal employees cannot hide behind immunity.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. NO IMMUNITY FOR CERTAIN AIRPORT SCREENING METHODS.

No law of the United States shall be construed to confer any immunity for a Federal employee or agency or any individual or entity that receives Federal funds, who subjects an individual to any physical contact (including contact with any clothing the individual is wearing), x-rays, or millimeter waves, or aids in the creation of or views a representation of any part of a individual's body covered by clothing as a condition for such individual to be in an airport or to fly in an aircraft. The preceding sentence shall apply even if the individual or the individual's parent, guardian, or any other individual gives consent.
    
Paul is also a big supporter of the National Opt Out day on November 24, which is encouraging airline travelers to opt out of the x-ray scans at TSA checkpoints.
    
Thankfully Paul is not the only authority figure who is appalled at the treatment of airline passengers.  The district attorney’s office in San Mateo County, California has made a promise to pursue charges against TSA workers whose behavior is equal to sexual assault.
    
“If it is skin to skin, if someone were to take their hand and put it underneath somebody’s blouse and touch someone inappropriately and go skin to skin, that’s a felony, and if it’s done simply over the clothing, according to California law, that’s a misdemeanor,” DA Steve Wagstaffe said in an interview.
    
In one case a 21-year-old woman had her blouse pulled down as TSA thugs began laughing and joking about her exposed breasts. Other workers commented about how they wished they could get video of the incident. Probably so they could masturbate over her.
    
These are the kinds of incidents that are waking people up to the tyranny that the U.S. Government tries to pass off as “protection”.
    
The people are fed up and it looks like there will be a public battle over the TSA and their place in American society. The bill is in an early stage right now, but the battle lines over personal privacy have been drawn.