The secrets of Revolution

Posted by David Konow

While the JJ Abrams show Revolution debuted to mixed reviews, it is definitely a ratings winner, and received the full series order very quickly after holding steady in the Nielsens for several weeks.

Whether you dig the show or not, it’s definitely got a great concept, and with all of us dependent on electricity, cars, cell phones, the Internet and Twitter, what indeed would we do if it all suddenly stopped?

As we see in most of JJ Abrams’s work, there’s secrets that are under wraps, and Revolution has a big one: How did it all happen? Well that secret may have already been revealed by Eric Kripke, who created the show, in an interview he just gave to the site Blastr.com
 
Rather than reiterate the theory as to how the lights went out, here’s a link to where it was said, and you can choose to go there if you want to know. This way, you won’t catch it here accidentally, even if you’re trying to avoid it on purpose. Aren’t we nice? 
 
Even though I don’t know jack about science, reading the theory myself it feels very plausible, and other viewers who don’t know much about science will probably find it believable as well. As Kripke revealed in the interview where he allegedly tells all, "We did some research," and there’s a 10% chance it could really happen within the next ten years. "The potential exists, which for me is terrifying."
 
Yet from the beginning, the point of Revolution is it’s not about the big reveal why we lost power. Kripke said they’ll unveil it sooner than later, and the show’s supposed to be much bigger than that. Once the reason the lights went out is revealed, the show goes right back to how we live with it. And if the reason is never revealed at all, that wouldn’t be such a bad thing either. Even if we know the answer, we still can’t fix it, and the world is left to deal with it.
 
As Kripke told the site Zap 2 It, "The longer you drag out an answer, the more pressure there is that it’s the greatest answer given in the history of man. Frankly, I’m not that smart. I’d rather answer a question and open a door to a bigger room. Even if we do answer the question of what caused the blackout, it leads directly to a bigger and scarier mystery."