LG showcases dual core G2 Smart TV

Posted by Shane McGlaun

LG has been in the Smart TV business for a while now and the company is set to launch its latest generation of Google TV sets later this month.

Of course, the Smart TV market hasn't exactly been booming in recent months, even though it's predicted to grow steadily at a significantly higher rate than the traditional TV sector. So we're not at all surprised that LG is showcasing its new G2 Smart TV powered by Google software at Internet Week New York.

As VentureBeat notes, the G2 is definitely worth of attention, as it boasts a dual-core CPU and supports motion remote control technology. Plus, the new set will also be the first Smart TV from LG to be 3D capable.

Yes, mainstream consumers have traditionally shunned 3D TVs, due in part to a rather salient lack of content. However, I've always believed people aren't buying 3D TVs because of the prohibitive cost associated with both the set itself and active glasses. Fortuntately, LG's new G2 uses passive glasses - making outfitting the whole family with their own 3D gear significantly cheaper than TVs that require active 3D glasses.

While the dual-core processor and the passive 3D glasses are quite appealing, the big differentiator for LG's TV is the remote control, which LG has rather aptly dubbed the "Magic Remote." The device offers a gesture touch area, along with an integrated microphone - allowing voice commands to be issued to the TV. The  set is also equipped with an integrated IR sensor that is quite similar to Nintendo's Wii sensor bar.

One side of the special remote control offers standard control keys, while the other side has an integrated thumb board for controlling the set.

LG has reportedly heavily customized the Google TV 2.0 user interface (UI), with VentureBeat confirming  a notably faster experience on the LG G2 sets, compared to competing devices from Sony and Logitech. 
Indeed, the dual-core processor powering LG's G2 Smart TV is a custom LG ARM L9 unit - and the first dual core processor inside a Google TV device.