This 3D printed chair is a game changer in terms of cost savings

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Daniel Widrig is a London-based architect and designer who has created quite a following for his 3D printed designs. Using the kind of tools and techniques that are usually reserved for 3D character creation in f/x heavy movies, Widrig has 3D printed a chair from a mixture of sugar paste, Japanese rice wine, and plaster. 

The impressive Degenerate Chair is a the result of a complex process that belies its simple mix of materials. 

"The recipe we used is based on existing research but we developed it further, because the original recipes usually result in parts that are too rough and fragile for high resolution prints," Widrig told Dezeen. "To our knowledge it is the first time a 1:1 working product of that scale has been printed this way."
 
"The recipe we used is based on existing research but we developed it further, because the original recipes usually result in parts that are too rough and fragile for high resolution prints," Widrig told Dezeen. "To our knowledge it is the first time a 1:1 working product of that scale has been printed this way."
 
Widrig claims the process that he used not only delivers a practical design, but it comes with huge cost savings. This is because, manufacturers of 3D printers typically want you to purchase materials direct from them. When the original manufacturer dropped out of the Degenerate Chair work with Widrig, he defaulted to a makeshift compound of materials.
 
For example, typical 3D printer bider for the original print run would have cost $300 for a one liter supply. The Japanese rice wine that was substituted cost $16. 
 
This kind of pioneering design work will make 3D printing more accessible and free up designers to pursue their vision.

 

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